Male vs.docx - MALE VS FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 1 Male vs Female Serial Killers Christine Sims CJ230 Grantham University MALE VS FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 2

Male vs.docx - MALE VS FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 1 Male vs...

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MALE VS. FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 1 Male vs. Female Serial Killers Christine Sims CJ230 Grantham University
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MALE VS. FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 2 Male vs. Female Serial Killers Female serial killers account for 80 percent of all serial killers, and they are very different from their male counterparts. Both male and female serial killers have a modus operandi (MO). Male and female serial killers are alike in some ways; however, they differ in many ways like their modus operandi, preferred victim types, and motives. Female serial killers murder crime starts much later life, while male serial killers begin at an early age, usually around twelve or thirteen, they start by killing and tormenting animals. Most female serial killers are place- specific, while most male serial killers are travelers, usually long-haul truck drivers. Male serial killers are given terrifying nicknames, like “The Ripper,” “The Night Stalker,” “The Stranger,” and “The moon maniac.” While female serial killers are given silly nicknames like “Beautiful Blonde Killer,” the “Giggling Grandma,” “Old Shoe Bon Annie,” and “Killer Granny” (Cengage Learning, 2016). Male serial killers kill mainly for power and sexual means, while female serial killers kill for monetary gain. Female serial killers tend to kill acquaintances, people who surround them; and they are often caregivers, and are well-educated, while male serial killers usually kill and attack strangers. In the case of Aileen Wuornos (1956-2002) who shot and killed seven men in Florida between 1989 and 1990. Wuornos claimed that her victims had raped or attempted to rape her while she was working as a prostitute and that all her killings were committed in self-defense. After shooting these men at point-blank range, Wuornos would take their personal belongings, such as watches, pictures, jewelry, cars, and money; where she either pawn them or kept them in a storage unit. Wuornos was raised by her grandfather, who often abused her, and her grandmother, who was an alcoholic. At 11, Wuornos started trading sexual favors for money, beer, and cigarettes (Kingdom, 2018). By 1991, Wuornos arrest record included illegal
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MALE VS. FEMALE SERIAL KILLERS 3 possession of a firearm, forgery, assault, and robbery; it also contained other felonies and misdemeanors, and the record was noted “Attitude POOR.” During the murder investigation, police discovered items belonging to Richard Mallory at a local pawnshop, with a receipt showing Wuornos’ thumbprint. Police traced other stolen items from Mallory to Wuornos; a camera from Mallory’s car was found inside a renter’s warehouse unit. Police then traced other items from Mallory’s car to people or pawnshops Wuornos had contacted. In 1991, when
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