3-31-08 - Punctuation and Passive Punctuation is the...

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1 Punctuation and Passive Punctuation is the basting that holds the fabric of language together. ☻Punctuation marks are the traffic signals of language: they tell us to slow down, notice this, take a detour, and stop. ☺The period and comma are the “invisible servants in fairy tales—the ones who bring glasses of water and pillows, not storms of weather or love.”
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2 The Comma 1. Use a “ , ” before the coordinating conjunction when the clauses are rather long and when you want to emphasize their distinctness, as when they have different subjects. Ex: For all its impressiveness, Monks Mound is only a part of the even more impressive Cahokia group, and Cahokia, in turn, is the only one, albeit the largest, of 10 large and small population centers and 50-odd farming villages. When the independent clauses are short and closely related in meaning, the comma is often omitted. Ex: Who will live and who will die? 2. Use a comma between 2 independent clauses joined by but , regardless of their length to emphasize the contrast. Ex: His achievements in office have been difficult to assess, but they have been formidable.
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3 The Comma 2 3. Use a comma after an introductory subordinate (dependent) clause or a long introductory phrase, prepositional phrase, participial phrase, gerund. Ex: Since encouraging women to spend money was the main point of magazines directed at us, they had distinctive characteristics. Ex: Far from being a neutral instrument, the law belongs to those who have the power to define and use it. Some subordinate conjunctions: after , although , as, as if, because, before, even though , if, since, so that, unless, until, when where, whether, while
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4 Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Modifiers Restrictive—No commas Nonrestrictive--commas Ex: Lemmon, who isn’t Jewish, plays Jews who aren’t Jewish either. The first who
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course ENGL 100 taught by Professor Baker during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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3-31-08 - Punctuation and Passive Punctuation is the...

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