3-24-08 - PARTS OF SPEECH Closed Classes The Structure...

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05/13/09 1 PARTS OF SPEECH Closed Classes The Structure Classes Determiners, Auxiliaries, Qualifiers, Prepositions, Conjunctions, Interrogatives, Expletives Plus Pronouns
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05/13/09 2 Determiners: Define relationship of noun to speaker, listener or reader Identify noun as specific or general Quantify noun specifically or generally Articles, possessive nouns, demonstrative pronouns (this, that, these, those), numbers, possessive pronouns (my, your, his, her, its, our, their, whose), quantifiers (all, some, many much, any, enough, few, fewer, more, most, less), specifiers (each, every, either, neither) Determiner is not always a single word (all of, only my, the first ten, just enough, half of, some of)
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05/13/09 3 Auxiliaries Is limited in membership and closed to new members Have, has had, having, be, is, are, am was, were, been, being, can, could, will, would, shall, should, may, might, must, ought to, do, does, did Sometimes act as auxiliaries: have to, has to, had to, get, gets, got, keep, keeps, kept He has to go. She got going. She got to go. They kept going.
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05/13/09 4 Qualifiers or Intensifiers— alter the meanings of adjectives and adverbs Traditional: these modifiers are classified as adverbs Qualifiers rarely modify verbs in American English Very, quite, rather, really, pretty, awfully, fairly, might, too, certainly, still, some, much Use most qualifiers sparingly in writing, but especially very
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05/13/09 5 Prepositions (meaning placed before) Of our 20 most frequently used words, 8 are prepositions. Can be one word or phrasal About, above, across, after, against, along,
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course ENGL 100 taught by Professor Baker during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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3-24-08 - PARTS OF SPEECH Closed Classes The Structure...

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