Synthesis 2_ Literature Review .pdf - Jelovich 1 Zoltan...

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Jelovich 1 Zoltan Jelovich 8 March 2018 Enhanced Interrogation Techniques More than 16 years ago, the United States launched its so-called “war on terror,” in an effort to find and eliminate those responsible for the attacks on the World Trade Center. The US implemented the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to track down suspected terrorists and question them about al-Qaeda, hoping to find ties to the attacks. This ultimately led to enhanced interrogation techniques, otherwise known as torture. By definition, torture is “the infliction of intense pain to punish, coerce, or afford sadistic pleasure (Merriam-Webster).” The most common and well-known enhanced interrogation technique today is waterboarding. Waterboarding consists of draping a soaked cloth over the victims face and pouring water through the cloth to simulate suffocation and drowning. It is the closest way to bring the interrogated to the verge of death without actually killing a person. Waterboarding, alongside other enhanced interrogation techniques, is seen as unethical and even unlawful by many. Some argue against it at all costs, while others argue it can be justifiable and has allowed the US to take a great step forward in the war on terror. In this paper, I will analyze the enhanced interrogation techniques used by the United States throughout three main topics of interest: the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence’s report on the CIA and its detention and interrogation program, the reliability and success of enhanced interrogation techniques, and the ethics of enhanced interrogation techniques.
Jelovich 2 The US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence’s report on the CIA and its detention and interrogation program To fully understand the severity and intensity of the enhanced interrogation techniques implemented by the US government, we must first take a look at the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence’s report on the CIA and its detention and interrogation program. The Senate Select Committee spent more than five years and $40 million analyzing over 6 million pages of documents. They classified their findings into a 6,700-page review, releasing a 525-page summary to the public. The summary shares many of the details of detainees held at CIA sites between 2002 and 2008, exposing how they were interrogated, what they were interrogated about, and what kinds of intelligence their interrogations provided the US. The Senate Select Intelligence Committee came to the conclusion that, “the use of the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques was not an effective means of obtaining accurate information or gaining detainee cooperation,” and “the interrogations of CIA detainees were far brutal and far worse than the CIA represented to policymakers and others.” I will discuss the problem associated with the accurateness of information obtained later on in this paper, for now I would like to focus on the statistics provided by the report. Another note to make is that

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