Normandy Landings REG

Normandy Landings REG - The Normandy Landings HIS 131-...

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The Normandy Landings HIS 131- 33176 Evan Trenkner 12/13/2007
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As twenty-three thousand Allied paratroopers and glide troopers plunged into the dark lands of France on a rainy June night, Nazi Germany was about to encounter a surprise that would ultimately change the scene of World War II. As morning arose on June 6 th , 1944, Nazi infantries slowly encountered hundreds of American and British warships approaching the coastlines of five French beaches, preparing for attack. In attempt to prevent the Nazi Empire, led by Fuehrer Adolf Hitler, spreading any further across Europe, and possibly the world, Operation Overlord was created by the Allied Forces with hopes of ending the Second World War instantly. Country leaders representing the United States, France, Great Britain and Canada combined their militaristic tactics in effort to invade the five main French beaches, which were all occupied by German soldiers. By the end of this operation, militaristic advantages quickly move toward Allied forces, foreshadowing an upcoming German Defeat. In preparation for the Normandy landings, detailed planning of attack was arranged accordingly during the Trident and Quadrant Conferences, held in a Mediterranean conference hall. 1 During this time, Generals Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bernard Montgomery were appointed in charge of the attacks, as Supreme and Ground Commanders, respectively. 2 Months before the initial attacks at Normandy, Montgomery suggested that three assaulting divisions would be more ideal than the preliminary one, which was accepted by Eisenhower quickly. This decision delayed the invasions from May to June 1944, the first of multiple invasion postponements. The assault phase of Operation Overlord, Operation Neptune, was deferred once 1 Rand McNally and Company, The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of World War II (Rand McNally and Company, 1977), 66-69 2 Rand McNally and Company, The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of World War II (Rand McNally and Company, 1977), 66-69 2
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again on June 5 th of the same year, due to unfavorable weather, leaving Allied troops on the horizon of the Atlantic Ocean overlooking French land. 3 Days before the invasions, General Eisenhower decides to order resistance forces within France to overtake railways and bridges and destroy them to prevent German diversion once naval invasions commence. These acts of containment include nine-hundred fifty rail cuts, road blocks, and minor acts of sabotage, all to prevent any chance of Nazi troops retreating. This plan destroyed every bridge of the Seine below Paris besides one on the Loire below Briare, a solitary way of escape for Allied forces. 4 This would ultimately be a large problem for the Germans. In Defense, German Field Marshall Erwin Rommel believes that infantry support is necessary very close to the beaches, giving additional backup. Meanwhile, Füehrer Hitler feels that all armored divisions are to be kept in reserve, further away. To gain permission from Hitler and his military
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course HIS 131 taught by Professor Rr during the Fall '08 term at Hartford.

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Normandy Landings REG - The Normandy Landings HIS 131-...

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