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Unformatted text preview: ANCILLA Western Civilization II: Modern West Spring 2019 Oklahoma Baptist University ANCILLA MODERN WEST: HISTORY AND LITERATURE THIRTY-SEVENTH EDITION VOLUME II Compiled and Edited by Andrew Armond Jonathan Callis Ben Myers Brent Newsom Carolyn Cole Laura Crouch Alan Noble Lindsey Panxhi D. H. Dilbeck Dwight Peck Kaine Ezell John Powell James Farthing Gerry Gunnin William Hagen Sherri Raney Glenn Sanders Robert Scrutchins Joe Hall Daniel Spillman Carol Humphrey Douglas Watson Shirley Jones Kristi Pope Key William Mitchell Sidney Watson Karen Youmans Donna Young William Mullins Design by: Lauren Raney Miller Oklahoma Baptist University Shawnee, Oklahoma 2019 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 5 DAY SYLLABUS—SPRING 2019 Roark et al., The American Promise UNIT I: EUROPE AND THE EMERGENCE OF THE UNITED STATES Date Topic Reading M 28 Jan INTRODUCTION ANC 1 –23 T 29 THE AMERICAN COLONIES WC 312-313, 340-344, 360-362 TAP 56-70, 82-99, 105-110 DOCS 1-6 (Smith, Mayflower, Edwards) ANC 25-53 (Unit Introduction, Edwards) W 30 AMERICAN ENLIGHTENMENT ANC 54-65 (Phillis Wheatley, Franklin ) DOCS 7-11 (Franklin) NAWL 40 (Franklin) R 31 COMPARATIVE REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY: AMERICA, Part 1 TAP 153-206, A1-A3 DOCS 13-15 (Paine) F 1 Feb. COMPARATIVE REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY: AMERICA, Part 2 TAP 208-236, A3-A14 ANC 66-76 (Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51) M4 REVOLUTIONARY IDEALISM NAWL 45-48 (Introduction to Wollstonecraft) ANC 77-96 (Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth) T5 COMPARATIVE REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY: FRANCE WC 452-474 DOCS 17-28 (Cahier, Sieyes, Declaration, Maximum, Robespierre) W6 NAPOLEON AND THE CONGRESS OF VIENNA WC 474-485, 533-537 DOCS 29- 36 (Catechism, Code, Spain, Russia) NAWL 900; 902-903 (Barbauld) R7 THE ROMANTIC IMPULSE: European Romanticism WC 505-511 NAWL 904-957(Blake, Holderlin, Wordsworth, Coleridge) ANC 96-97 (Goethe) F8 THE ROMANTIC IMPULSE: European Romanticism, continued NAWL 969-991 (Shelley, Keats, Heine) ANC 99-102 (Byron) Date Topic Reading M 11 INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION WC 485-503 TAP 298-304, 330-341 DOCS 41-52 (Malthus, Child Labor, Luddites, Weavers, Owen) T 12 19th CENTURY IDEOLOGIES WC 515-531, 542-553, 574-576 AND THE REVOLUTIONS DOCS 37-40 (James Mill, Mazzini) OF 1848 W 13 SHELLEY, Frankenstein Shelley ix-xviii, 1-60 R 14 SHELLEY, Frankenstein Shelley 61-105 F 15 SHELLEY, Frankenstein Shelley 107-161 M 18 DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA TAP 304-321, 356-358 DOCS 53-69 (Tocqueville, Calhoun, Jackson) ANC 103-107 (Emerson, Divinity School Address/Nature) T 19 AMERICAN ROMANTICISM: NAWL 1020-1021 ANC 108-134 (Whitman) WHITMAN, “Song of Myself” W 20 AMERICAN OPTIMISM AND ITS COUNTERPOINTS TAP 330-332, 341-348, 356-358 (review) DOCS 71-74 (O’Sullivan, Worcester v. Georgia) ANC 135-137 (John Ross, “Letter to a Friend”) R 21 SLAVERY: DOUGLASS, Narrative NAWL 805-866 F 22 SLAVERY IN AMERICA TAP 362-390 DOCS 75-84 (Jacobs, Fugitive Slave Act, Dred Scott) M 25 UTILITY DAY T 26 Unit I Examination UNIT II: NINETEENTH CENTURY LIBERALISM AND ITS DISCONTENTS Date Topic Reading W 27 NATIONALISM AND LIBERALISM IN ACTION IN EUROPE ANC 138-143 WC 582-596 DOCS 39-40 (Mazzini) (review) R 28 NATIONALISM AND LIBERALISM IN ACTION IN THE U.S. TAP 392-401, 404-420, 424-443, 446-456 DOCS 81-90 (Dred Scott [review], Inaugural Address, Emancipation Proclamation, Gettysburg Address) F 1 Mar. MODERNIZATION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES WC 605-613, 627 TAP 520-531, 550-573 M4 POSITIVISM, DARWINISM, AND SOCIAL DARWINISM WC 561-569, 575-576 (review) DOCS 91-96 (Darwin, Wilberforce, Spencer) T5 RESPONSE TO A LIFE BASED ON LIBERALISM: TOLSTOY, “The Death of Ivan Ilych” ANC 144-145 (Russian Reforms) NAWL 1436-1478 (Tolstoy) W6 TRANSATLANTIC FEMINISM WC 576-579 TAP 357-358, 467-472, 536-537, 560563 (review), 580-582, 590-593, 655-656 DOCS 101-108 (Seneca Falls, Mill, Pankhurst, Goodwin) ANC 146-147 (Stanton) R7 THE FEMINIST IMPULSE: WHARTON, Age of Innocence ANC 148-149 (Wharton) Wharton 1-73 F8 WHARTON, Age of Innocence Wharton 73-165 M 11 WHARTON, Age of Innocence Wharton 165-235 T 12 POPULISTS AND PROGRESSIVES TAP 582-590, 593-597, 610-623, 631-636 DOCS 109-116 (Platform, Bryan, Addams) W 13 CRANE, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (A Story of New York) ANC 150-197 (Crane) Date Topic Reading R 14 SOCIALISM AND MARXISM WC 569-572 TAP 530-531 (review), 612-617 (review), 635-636 (review) DOCS 97-100 (Marx) F 15 THE NEW CONSCIOUSNESS WC 656-680 DOCS 117-120 (Nietzsche, Freud) M 18F 22 SPRING BREAK No Class M 25 RACIAL ISSUES IN THE LATE 19TH CENTURY IN THE U.S. TAP 458-486, 532-536, 636-639 T 26 DU BOIS, The Souls of Black Folk ANC 198-228 (Du Bois) W 27 IMPERIALISM WC 629-651, 653-654 TAP 597-607, 623, 627-631, 644-646 DOCS 121 (Kipling) ANC 232-233 (Kipling) R 28 CRISIS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE MODERN AGE: CONRAD, Heart of Darkness NAWL 1691-1736 ANC 229-231 (Conrad) F 29 CONRAD, Heart of Darkness NAWL 1737-1755 M 1 Apr. THE ROAD TO WAR WC 682-699 DOCS 123-127 (Ultimatum, Mobilization) T2 THE GREAT WAR WC 699-712 DOCS 129-134 (Trenches, Fourteen Points, Germany) W3 THE INDIVIDUAL AT WAR ANC 234-244 (WWI poetry, Twain) R4 KAFKA, The Metamorphosis NAWL 1877-1913 F5 THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION WC 712-731 DOCS 135-144 (Gapon, Lenin, Babine) M8 UTILITY DAY T9 Unit II Examination UNIT III: CRISIS OF THE MODERN AGE Date Topic Reading W 10 MODERNISM: ELIOT ANC 245-252 NAWL 2119-2122, poems assigned by section R 11 THE 1920s-1930s: CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS IN THE U.S. TAP 666-667, 674-704, 706-725, 728-736 ANC 253-259 (Guthrie) DOCS 151-159 (Palmer, Carter, Roosevelt) F 12 THE LOST GENERATION: HEMINGWAY, The Sun Also Rises Hemingway 11-71 M 15 HEMINGWAY, The Sun Also Rises Hemingway 75-173 T 16 HEMINGWAY, The Sun Also Rises Hemingway 174-251 W 17 THE 1920s-1930s: CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS IN EUROPE WC 724-746 (some review) DOCS 145-146 (Trotsky) R 18 ROAD TO WAR WC 746-765, 789-799 TAP 740-749 DOCS 163-173 (Hitler, Sterilization, Hossbach, Churchill) F 19 GOOD FRIDAY HOLIDAY No Class M 22 WW II AND THE HOLOCAUST WC 799-822 TAP 753-755, 759-770 DOCS 175-182 (Churchill, Himmler, Resistance, Hoess) T 23 LITERATURE OF THE NAWL 2248-2262 (Borowski) HOLOCAUST NAWL 2274-2281 (Celan) W 24 TWO SIDES OF THE COLD WAR WC 827-842 TAP 774-783, 791-795, 804-809, 862-866 DOCS 147-149, 183-185 (Khrushchev, Kennan) R 25 MID-CENTURY RESPONSE: EXISTENTIALISM NAWL 2309-2320 (Camus) WC 768-87 (esp. 782-85) DOCS 161-62 (Sartre) Date Topic Reading F 26 DECOLONIZATION: WC 833-836 (review) THE U.S. IN VIETNAM TAP 805-806 (review), 866-872, 875, 878-888 DOCS 191 (Fanon) M 29 THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT TAP 749-750, 757-758, 786-788, 819-825, 838844, 856-857 ANC 260-266 (King) DOCS 187-188 (Brown) T 30 CLASS AND RACE IN AMERICA NAWL 2293-2309 (Baldwin) NAWL 2634-2649 (Morrison) W 1 May MAKING ROOM FOR CHANGE: SOCIAL PROTEST AND THE GENERATION GAP (1960-1972) TAP 816-817, 842-848, 850-851, 873-879, 882884 DOCS 189-190 (Johnson) R2 O’BRIEN, The Things They Carried Excerpts assigned by section F3 O’BRIEN, The Things They Carried Excerpts assigned by section M6 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE NAWL 2549-2560 (Ngugi Wa Thiong’o) NAWL 2631-2633 (Jamaica Kincaid) T7 DETENTE AND EQUILIBRIUM (19721985) and THE FALL OF COMMUNISM (1985-1991) WC 842-852 TAP 879-888 (review), 890-899, 904-906, 916919, 925-930 DOCS 193-194 (Reagan) W8 McCARTHY, The Road McCarthy 3-156 R9 McCARTHY, The Road McCarthy 157-287 F 10 ISSUES IN WESTERN WC 860-879 CIVILIZATION TODAY TAS 817-840 DOCS 195-197 (Waco) M 13 FINAL EXAM 8:00-10:00 ANCILLA CONTENTS Volume II ENGL 2023/HIST 2023 Page PREFACE 1 INTRODUCTION 2 ON PLAGIARISM IN TERM PAPERS 20 ON READING MODERN LITERATURE 23 AMERICAN EXCEPTIONALISM 25 UNIT I Introductory Essay: Europe and the Emergence of the United States 26 Timeline Jonathan Edwards “A Personal Narrative” “A Divine and Supernatural Light” Phillis Wheatley Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral Benjamin Franklin Federalist Papers No. 10 & 51 Mary Wollstonecraft From A Vindication of the Rights of Woman William Wordsworth, “The French Revolution” Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “Prometheus” George Gordon, Lord Byron From Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage Ralph Waldo Emerson “Divinity School Address” Nature, Chapter One Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself” Letter from John Ross UNIT II Introductory Essay: Nineteenth-Century Liberalism and Its Discontents Timeline Russian Reforms Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Solitude of Self” Edith Wharton, Age of Innocence Introduction Stephen Crane, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets William Edward Burghardt Du Bois “The Souls of Black Folk” 32 34 46 56 63 66 77 96 97 99 103 106 108 135 138 143 144 146 148 150 198 201 Heart of Darkness reading aid Rudyard Kipling, “White Man’s Burden” World War I Poetry Mark Twain, “The War Prayer” W.B. Yeats, “The Second Coming” 229 232 234 240 244 UNIT III 245 252 253 260 Timeline Song Lyrics by Woody Guthrie Martin Luther King, “Letter from Birmingham Jail” MATERIALS ON RESERVE and ONLINE 267 WRITING STRONG PARAGRAPHS 280 COMMON EXAM RUBRIC 284 Preface This Ancilla provides you with the materials you need for the Western Civilization course exclusive of the required textbooks. Along with readings needed to supplement those books, it contains comments on the nature of the course, its objectives, and specific suggestions for studying and for writing essays for the course. The material on writing essays for Civ is generally a duplication of advice in the style manual currently used in Freshman English classes. It is included here primarily for transfer students. For each of the three units, there is an essay which outlines the basic structure and major themes of that unit. These essays are meant to be interpretive guidelines only, interpretations of literature and historical events offered by individual instructors or arrived at by classes might be somewhat different and will take precedence over unit essay guidelines. On the last pages of the Ancilla is a list of books on reserve in the OBU library. Your writing style manual provides much additional help in finding resources, as does Section IV of the "Introduction" in this Ancilla. You should also check handouts from your class instructors for help in doing research. Special thanks are due to Carol Humphrey for putting together the unit timelines. Introduction Objectives and Requirements Modern West: History and Literature at Oklahoma Baptist University is a demanding course, and it must be, because it aims at many objectives. We shall enumerate and explain some of the more important ones here. Objectives 1) Civ hopes, by offering readings from some of the best thinkers of the past and then by discussing them with you, to help you familiarize yourself with the major ideas and values of the Western heritage common to most of us. Many of these ideas and values continue to influence personal and institutional behavior in modern times. The rationale for this study of our heritage is as follows. An old Latin adage runs: primum vivere, deinde philosophari-"first live, then philosophize"--which is sane advice, except that to a great extent one must first philosophize just in order to live. We believe that the modern world presents problems (both social and personal) for all of us, and that these problems must be faced, and that they must be faced by intelligent men and women well schooled in the intellectual history of our culture. Here is the chain of reasoning involved. We believe: a) that being authentically alive requires our constant and imaginative attention to the world and its problems, to other people, and to ourselves; b) that this attention, to be productive and self-fulfilling, will require familiarity with the major concepts, values, perspectives, and motives of ourselves and other people in our present environment; and c) that this familiarity with the present, to be of constructive use to us in solving the problems of the present, must be grounded in the past. Examining contemporary problems in the contexts of past cultures can provide examples of alternative strategies for dealing with them now, and studying the concepts, values, and motives by which men have lived and acted in the past can tell us much about the concepts and values by which we, even now, live and act. We cannot understand the way the present world is unless we understand how it came to be that way. But there is another reason besides this sort of utility for studying our heritage. Each of us has his or her own life. But it's a woefully short one, all in all; 2 "Alas, we scarce live long enough to try/Whether a new-made clock run right or lie," as John Donne put it. By living our own lives merely, we can experience in that short time only the tiniest fraction of what it means to be a human being. But as each man and woman has a life, so Man has a life, and as each woman and man experiences, learns, and grows, so does Man. We can experience our own brief lives directly, but by attending to the history of our race we can experience, albeit indirectly, the lives of all men, the life of Mankind itself. What it means to be a human being is largely, at present, what the totality of human beings have done, thought, and felt; with a little imagination, we can enter their acts, thoughts, and feelings, and we can expand our own range of experience enormously. Civ has other objectives, too, which are not unrelated. 2) Civ hopes, also by reading and discussion, to help you acquaint yourself with the major forms of expression which these ideas and values commonly may take (such as satire, folk epic, essay, novel, lyric poem, history, etc.) and the different ways in which these forms are usually understood. That is, it hopes to aid you in training yourself to read critically and well, so that you can do so for the rest of your life. 3) It hopes, by testing every idea in terms of context, its consequences, its relations to other ideas, and by providing a continuous opportunity for you to do the same, to help you improve your ability to think clearly and logically, and to think critically, without vagueness, oversimplification, or undue credulity. 4) And it hopes, by discussions, exams, and essay assignments (all of which you will enjoy beyond measure), to help you improve your ability to express your own ideas and reasoning, both in speech and in writing, intelligently and convincingly. Participation You will observe that all of these objectives are aimed at your benefit. They assume that the more intelligent, informed, and articulate you are, the "better off," the happier, and (finally) the more fully human you will be, and they presuppose that these are your goals for yourself as well as our goals for you. Therefore, we anticipate your active and intelligent cooperation in achieving them; indeed, if you will look these four objectives over one more time, you will see that they cannot possibly be met without that cooperation. One can be forced by somebody else to learn facts, but one cannot be forced to become intelligent and sensitive. Because it relies upon interaction more than most others do, this course, without your help and active engagement, will be worthless to you. Content Civ, then, is primarily a course in intellectual history and in the intellectual process itself. It should not be conceived of as simply an ordinary "history 3 course," no more as an ordinary "literature course," for its subject matter (and many of its methods) will be drawn, not only from these two disciplines, but also from such ultimately related fields as the arts, philosophy, economics, music, theology, sociology, psychology, and the physical and life sciences. But understanding ideas also means understanding their evolution through time, in varying concrete circumstances, and so the course is most conveniently organized into a roughly chronological framework: we begin with the ancient Romans and end with ourselves. Problem-Solving The ideas with which we will deal do not, by themselves, exist; thinkers must think them. Likewise, even when thought, these ideas are, in themselves, more or less inert; to be useful they must be used. Accordingly, major ideas will often be broached to you in terms neither of abstract entities removed from men nor of historical phenomena of a merely textbook past, but rather in terms of problems and solutions in real situations--in two ways. In the historical context, we will direct your attention to problems faced by the culture at various given times, solutions arrived at (or despaired of) by it, alternatives sometimes unsuccessful, sometimes never tried. In class format, we will often (in a manner) recreate these problems, suggest the resources available in their times for their solution, and encourage you to participate in their solving and in assessing the strengths and weaknesses of whatever new or adjusted values emerge. (It's vital that you remember at all times that these are, or were, real people we are talking about, more or less like ourselves, with real hopes and real fears, not merely names and titles from some textbook world that never existed and never wanted to.) Ideally, this emphasis upon critical thinking should encourage in you the translation of unexamined assumptions into conscious values, to be objectively considered, to be accepted, altered, or discarded, to be woven into coherent patterns, to be defended if they merit defending. Summary of Objectives The intentions of the Civ sequence, as outlined above, can be summarized as an attempt to inculcate the matter and the forms of sound thought, thought in its widest sense but especially that concerned with questions of value. It is aimed generally at encouraging in you, with your own help, the ability to think well, to make assessments and decisions in virtually all questions of your political, social, moral, intellectual, and academic life. A Note on Academic Freedom Because our course, indeed because the University, is devoted to free and open inquiry into the natures and relative merits of all ideas, and because we are devoted to the unhindered examination of human experience of all significant kinds, Academic Freedom must be preserved at all costs. Therefore, for the purposes of this course, every important idea must get a fair hearing, and no idea, whether Christian or atheist, communist or capitalist, democratic or totalitarian, is to be considered either true or false before it has been heard and tested by the 4 class. No one, student or teacher, is to be criticized for responsibly ensuring a fair hearing for any idea whatever. As J.S. Mill maintains, in a fair contest between "right" ideas and "wrong" ones, the "right" ideas, if they are really right, will win. Description of the Course Civ is a double-credit, two semester course. Throughout the year, consideration of certain themes, many of which you encountered in your studies of Classical literature in your Freshman year, will recur periodically in all sections of the course. They may be summarized as follows: 1) the evolving concept of man and his role in the universe (and thus the myths and models which men create to explain that role); 2) the tension between the individual and the community, which is inherent in society and usually regulated by the state and law; 3) the tension between idealism and realism which is imbedded in Western thought, the tension between faith and reason, similarly imbedded, and the epistemological problem of how one knows what is real, true, or good; 4) the continuing evolution and disintegration of a coherent and united Western Weltanshauung ("world view"), resulting from the acquisition of new knowledge and the decay of old institutions; 5) the social and intellectual dislocation resulting from the increasing pace of change; 6) the dynamic interrelationship between various religious, social, economic, and political institutions; 7) the role of the arts in reflecting, interpreting, and molding cultural values. These themes must be considered and reconsidered from time to time because change is apparently inevitable and ...
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