Legalizeit - 4, number 6, pp. 38-52, November/December...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Legalize It. By: Allison Wiest
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ending marijuana prohibition would benefit society by making the drug safer to use, reducing drug related crime, and freeing up time and resources to use in other areas of need.
Background image of page 2
Advocates of Legalization
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Opposition of Legalization
Background image of page 4
Legalizing Marijuana Makes Use Safer.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relative Addictiveness of Common Drugs (100=Most Addictive; 0=Least) Dru g Rating Nicotine 99 Alcohol 81 Heroin 80 Cocaine (Nasal) 71 Caffeine 70 Marijuana 22 Conclusion: (1) The most addictive drug, nicotine, is not only not scheduled, it can be purchased without a prescription by anyone over the age of 18. (2) Cocaine is about as addictive as coffee or tea's caffeine. (3) Marijuana is the least addictive Source Data: Reformatted from the book The Chemistry of Mind-Altering Drugs by Daniel M. Perrine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry at Loyola College, Baltimore, Maryland. Published by the American Chemical Society, Washington D.C., 1997. * "Hooked: Why Isn't Everyone an Addict?" by Deborah Franklin, In Health magazine, volume
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 4, number 6, pp. 38-52, November/December 1990. Legalization Reduces Drug Related Crime Legalization Saves Resources And Money To Be Used Elsewhere. Year Total Drug Arrests Total Marijuana Arrests Marijuana Trafficking/Sale Arrests Marijuana Possession Arrests 2005 1,846,351 786,545 90,471 696,074 2004 1,745,712 771,605 87,286 684,319 2003 1,678,192 755,186 92,300 662,886 2002 1,538,813 697,082 83,096 613,986 2001 1,586,902 723,628 82,519 641,109 2000 1,579,566 734,497 88,455 646,042 National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws Statistics Bureau of Justice Special Report $22,632 annually per inmate $10 billion annually on marijuana charges Oppositions Biggest Argument Marijuana is a Gateway Drug National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws Statistics For every 104 Americans who have tried marijuana, there is only one regular user of cocaine and less than one user of heroin....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Prof.bradley during the Spring '08 term at Arcadia University.

Page1 / 13

Legalizeit - 4, number 6, pp. 38-52, November/December...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online