Lowering the Drinking Age - Wenger 1 Victoria Wenger Professor Nelson English 101 8 April 2019 Why We Shouldn\u2019t Lower the Drinking Age As we sit at

Lowering the Drinking Age - Wenger 1 Victoria Wenger...

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Wenger 1 Victoria Wenger Professor Nelson English 101 8 April 2019 Why We Shouldn’t Lower the Drinking Age As we sit at red lights, waiting for the incandescent bulb inside the stop light to glow a bright green, we often forget the power our brain has when we’re driving. This “power” prevents accidents, influences better decisions, and therefore allows us to think clearly. This ability to think in an effective manner is compromised when individuals choose to drink. If this poses such a threat to safety, why are we willing to lower the drinking age restriction imposed on younger adults? The drinking age should be kept at 21 because it protects the youth, enforces students and young adults to make smarter decisions, lowers the number of drinking related crashes, and essentially saves lives. It is crucial to keep the drinking age at 21 in order to prevent irresponsible actions by those that are too immature to handle alcohol. If we lower it to 18, this will give even younger teens the incentive to drink, therefore putting more and more lives at risk. According to William Dejong, “Age-21 law is the most defensible public-health policy we have when it comes to dealing with youth alcohol problems" (Wasley). This makes sense because teenagers are often presented with numerous situations that often stress them out. Considering the amount of hormones in a person's system during puberty, teens may lash out and make poor decisions, including those that revolve around alcohol. Why lower the drinking age then, if they are already faced with many stressful decisions to make already? Some may explain that an 18 year old is an adult, and while that may be true, that doesn’t change the fact that younger teens may feel inclined to drink if the drinking age is closer to their own age. Sadly, if teens choose to act on
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Wenger 2 this incentive to drink, they could damage their brain and potentially acquire poor habits and extreme outcomes in the future. The centers for disease control and prevention states that drinking below the age of 21 is “linked with death from alcohol poisoning, suicide, changes in brain development,”as well as “poor or failing grades”(CDC). The youth need to be protected at all costs because they are the forefront of our future. If we give them a substance that could
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  • Spring '16
  • nelson
  • Drinking culture, National Minimum Drinking Age Act, Victoria Wenger

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