nr 507 week 5 part two.docx - Skip To Content due Oct 7 2018 Week 5 Discussion Part Two 2222 unread replies.7575 replies A three-month-old baby boy

nr 507 week 5 part two.docx - Skip To Content due Oct 7...

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Skip To Content due Oct 7, 2018 Week 5: Discussion Part Two 22 22 unread replies. 75 75 replies. A three-month-old baby boy comes into your clinic with the main complaint that he frequently vomits after eating. He often has a swollen upper belly after feeding and acts fussy all the time. According to his parents, the vomiting has become more frequent this past week and he is beginning to lose weight. After careful history taking, a thorough physical exam and diagnostic work-up, the patient is diagnosed with pyloric stenosis. 1. What is the etiology of pyloric stenosis? 2. Describe in detail the pathophysiological process of pyloric stenosis. 3. Identify hallmark signs identified from the physical exam and presenting symptoms. What diagnostic tests would help to confirm the diagnosis of pyloric stenosis? 4. Describe the pathophysiology of complications of pyloric stenosis. 5. What teaching would you provide this patient/parents regarding pyloric stenosis? In addition to the textbook, utilize at least one peer-reviewed, evidence based resource to develop your post. Search entries or author Filter replies by unread Unread Collapse replies Expand replies Subscribed Collapse Subdiscussion Tiffani Pendleton Tiffani Pendleton Sep 30, 2018Sep 30, 2018 at 5:03pm Manage Discussion Entry Dr. Schwindenhammer and Classmates, Etiology of Pyloric Stenosis According to McCance and Huether (2014), pyloric stenosis is a blockage of the pyloric sphincter due to enlargement of the sphincter muscle. A common issue for infants that affects more males than females. As with this infant, it usually presents with vomiting right after eating as the main symptom. According to McCance and Huether (2014), the exact cause is unknown, but has been attributed to increased gastrin secretion by the mother during the final trimester of pregnancy,
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administration of prostaglandin E, and even genetic predisposition with family history. Pathophysiological Process of Pyloric Stenosis According to Ndongo, Tolefac, Tambo, Abanda, Ngowe, Fola, Dzekem, Weledji, Sosso and Minkande (2018), the enlargement and overproduction of the smooth muscle cells of the pylorus causes narrowing and encroachment by the pyloric sphincter muscle which makes it difficult for adequate movement of food through the pylorus. With the extra work being done to try and move the food through the pylorus, it becomes even more enlarged exacerbating the problem. Hallmark Signs and Diagnostic Tests The main sign of pyloric stenosis would be the sudden, projectile vomiting after eating. According to McCance and Huether (2014), along with the projectile vomiting that usually starts around 2-3 weeks of age, the infant usually wants to eat again immediately after vomiting and constipation is always an issue because the food never reaches the intestines as it should. If the infant continues to vomit with feedings, then dehydration and electrolyte issues are soon to follow as well. Since food never actually reaches the intestines, these infants will have infrequent stools and will likely be fussy and lethargic from lack of intake. Although diagnosis is usually made
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