The Emotional Imagery of Magical Realism in Like Water for Chocolate - Amber Robison EN222(EX16 OT Intro to Literature 7 July 2017 Writing Project#2

The Emotional Imagery of Magical Realism in Like Water for Chocolate

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Amber Robison EN222 (EX16) OT - Intro to Literature7 July 2017Writing Project #2The Emotional Imagery of Magical Realism in Like Water for ChocolateMerriam Webster defines magical realism as, “painting in a meticulously realistic style of imaginary or fantastic scenes or images” or, “a literary genre or style associated especially with Latin America that incorporates fantastic or mythical elements into otherwise realistic fiction” (Magic Realism). It is no shock that the novel Like Water For Chocolate used magical realism, as it took place during the Mexican Revolution, and Mexico is a Latin American country. Esquivel combined fantasy and reality to convey the intensity of emotions Tita felt towards her struggles, and triumphs, and the emotions Tita's food made other people feel. Readers could see how Tita’s emotions are transported to others through her food during Pedro and Rosaura’s wedding. Tita was inconsolable when she found out her older sister was marrying her love Pedro. However, Tita still shared responsibility with Nacha to make the cake for the wedding. The cooking was grueling and the cake required one hundred and seventy eggs. Eventually, with Nacha’s permission, Tita breaks down and weeps uncontrollably into the cake batter and soon the icing. At the wedding Tita noticed when the guests, “..took their first bite of cake, everyone was flooded with a great wave of longing. Even Pedro, usually so proper, was having trouleholding back his tears. Mama Elena, who hadn’t shed a single tear over her husband’s death, was sobbing silently. But the weeping was just the first symptom of a strange intoxication- an acute attack of pain and frustration- that seized the guests and scattered them across the patio and the grounds and in the bathroom, all of them wailing over lost love. Everyone there, every last person, fell under this spell, and not very many of them 1

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