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This article was downloaded by: 10.3.98.93 On: 20 Jul 2019 Access details: subscription number Publisher: Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG, UK The Routledge Handbook of Language and Intercultural Communication Jane Jackson Language, Identity and Intercultural Communication Publication details Kimberly A. Noels, Tomoko Yashima, Rui Zhang Published online on: 30 Nov 2011 How to cite :- Kimberly A. Noels, Tomoko Yashima, Rui Zhang. 30 Nov 2011, Language, Identity and Intercultural Communication from: The Routledge Handbook of Language and Intercultural Communication Routledge Accessed on: 20 Jul 2019 PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR DOCUMENT Full terms and conditions of use: This Document PDF may be used for research, teaching and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproductions, re-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents will be complete or accurate or up to date. The publisher shall not be liable for an loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material.
Downloaded By: 10.3.98.93 At: 11:19 20 Jul 2019; For: 9780203805640, chapter3, 10.4324/9780203805640.ch3 3 Language, identity and intercultural communication Kimberly A. Noels, Tomoko Yashima and Rui Zhang 1. Introduction It is commonly noted that, owing to technological advances in transportation and communication, the redistribution of production and labour, and other reasons, the potential for intercultural contact is currently greater than it has ever been in human history. Moreover, with an estimated 6,900 languages across the approximately 200 countries of the world (Lewis 2009), it is very likely that intercultural contact will involve encounters between people who speak di ff erent languages. Sometimes, these encounters take place between members of groups with a long history of inter- action and thus they are rather routine, such that personal and normative expectations regarding language use e ff ectively guide the communication process to predictable, if not mutually satis- fying, outcomes. At other times, we are less well acquainted with our interlocutors practices, and so part of the process of communication involves grappling with the acquisition of new verbal and nonverbal communication systems. Regardless of the level of familiarity, a variety of sociopsychological and sociocultural processes operate within every intercultural interaction.

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