Lab 1 TLC Analysis of Analgesic Drugs

Lab 1 TLC Analysis of Analgesic Drugs - TLC Analysis of...

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TLC Analysis of Analgesic Drugs Author: Holly Polk Instructor: Oleksandr Zhurakovskyi Organic Chemistry Lab 243A, Section 010 Date Work Performed: January 29 , 2009 Abstract The objective of this lab is to use Thin-Layer chromatography to determine the composition of a series of painkillers. TLC will aid in deciding the relative polarity of organic compounds by comparing functional groups. Procedures include running plates of standards, mixtures of standards, and four different over the counter drugs, then using their Rf values to make determinations. From the student’s analgesics results, the most polar to the least polar compounds were No Doz (0.21), Tylenol (0.63), Bayer (0.86), and then Motrin (0.94). From the Standards from the prep room, the most polar to the least polar of the compounds were Caffeine (0.15), Acetaminophen (0.53), Acetylsalicylic acid (0.75), and then Ibuprofen (0.83).
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Introduction The purpose of this lab is to use thin-layer chromatography to determine the composition of a series of painkillers. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) is a chromatography technique used to separate a mixture of two or more compounds or ions. When a mixture contains more than one reagent, thin-layer chromatography can separate each reagent to see what substances they contain, which aids in identification. Chromatography works on the principle that there is a stationary and a mobile phase, because separation will happen if one part of a substance sticks more to the stationary phase than another one. A more polar molecule will stick more strongly to the more polar stationary phase than a less polar molecule. In TLC, a small amount of the medicines to be evaluated is spotted near the bottom of the plate. The TLC plate is then placed in a shallow pool of a solvent in a jar so that only the very bottom of the plate is in the liquid. This liquid, or the eluent, is the mobile phase, and it slowly moves up the TLC plate by capillary action. The plates can be examined with UV light to see the components as dark spots against a bright green-blue background. The plates may also be visualized by putting the plate in an iodine chamber. The compounds will be stained with iodine and allow for greater observation. After that, calculate the Rf values for each spot. Unknowns can be identified using Rf values, fluorescence in UV light and changes due to iodine exposure. The Rf value is a physical constant of an organic molecule and can be calculated by using the formula: Rf = distance traveled by the compound / distance traveled by the solvent.
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Physical Constants Compound name Structure Mol ecul ar weig ht * Which brands contain the
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Lab 1 TLC Analysis of Analgesic Drugs - TLC Analysis of...

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