Phys2212_32.1+to+32.3+and+32.7

Phys2212_32.1+to+32.3+and+32.7 - Physics 2212 Electricity...

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Physics 2212 Electricity and Magnetism Lecture 18 (Knight: 32.1,3,7) Magnetic Fields and Forces
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Tape a bar magnet to a cork and allow it to float in a dish of water. The magnet turns and aligns itself with the north-south direction. The end of the magnet that points north is called the magnet’s north-seeking pole , or simply its north pole . The other end is the south pole . Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 1
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 2 Bring the north poles of two bar magnets near to each other. Then bring the north pole of one bar magnet near the south pole of another bar magnet. When the two north poles are brought near, a repulsive force between them is observed. When the a north and a south pole are brought near, an attractive force between them is observed.
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 3 Bring the north pole of a bar magnet near a compass needle. When the north pole is brought near, the north-seeking pole of the compass needle points away from the magnet’s north pole. Apparently the compass needle is itself a little bar magnet.
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 4 Use a hacksaw to cut a bar magnet in half. Can you isolate the north pole and the south pole on separate pieces? No. When the bar is cut in half two new (but weaker) bar magnets are formed, each with a north pole and a south pole. The same result would be found, even if the magnet was sub-divided down to the microscopic level.
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 5 Bring a bar magnet near an assortment of objects. Some of the objects, e.g. paper clips, will be attracted to the magnet. Other objects, e.g., glass beads, aluminum foil, copper tacks, will be unaffected. The objects that are attracted to the magnet are equally attracted by the north and south poles of the bar magnet
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Experiments with Magnetism: Experiment 6 Bring a magnet near the electrode of an electroscope. There is no observed effect, whether the electroscope is charged or discharged and whether the north or the south pole of the magnet is used.
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Physics 2212 - Lecture 18 Conclusions from Experiments 1. Magnetism is not the same as electricity. Magnetic poles are similar to charges but have important differences . 2. Magnetism is a long range force . The compass needle responds to the bar magnet from some distance away. 3. Magnets have two poles , “north” (N) and “south” (S). Like poles repel and opposite poles attract. 4. Poles of a magnet can be identified with a compass . A north magnet pole (N) attracts the south-seeking end of the compass needle (which is a south pole). 5. Some materials (e.g., iron) stick to magnets and others do not. The materials that are attracted are called magnetic materials .
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2009 for the course PHYSICS 2212 taught by Professor Geist during the Fall '09 term at Georgia Perimeter.

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Phys2212_32.1+to+32.3+and+32.7 - Physics 2212 Electricity...

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