No Child Left behind

No Child Left behind - Andrew Rapaport Econ 367 Is the No...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Andrew Rapaport Econ 367 Is the No Child Left Behind Act Working? No There are over 48 million elementary and secondary education students in this country, and the federal government spends slightly more than 500 billion dollars on them annually. The bulk of the spending is financed by state and local taxes, but there has been a major federal component since the passing of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 1965. Many Americans are concerned with public education for many reasons. One reason is that public education uses up a large amount of tax dollars and for that price and Americans are concerned that the results they are seeing are subpar. In 1983 a report titled A Nation At Risk talked about many of the problems in the public education system in spite of many “reforms”. In 2000 the U.S. Department of Education reported that “Upon graduating from high school, few students have acquired the math and science skills necessary to compete in the knowledge-based economy.” So in 2000 during his presidential campaign, George W. Bush emphasized education
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/09/2009 for the course ECON 367 taught by Professor Molly during the Spring '09 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 2

No Child Left behind - Andrew Rapaport Econ 367 Is the No...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online