2025MGT Lecture 5 0802

2025MGT Lecture 5 0802 - Chapter 3 Attitudes and Job...

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Chapter 3 Attitudes and Job Satisfaction
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2 After studying this chapter, you should be able to: 1. Contrast the three components of an attitude 1. Identify the role that consistency plays in attitudes 2. Summarise the relationship between attitudes and behaviour 3. Discuss similarities and differences between job satisfaction and the other job attitudes discussed 4. Summarise the main causes of job satisfaction 5. Identify four employee responses to dissatisfaction . Learning Objectives
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3 Attitudes Evaluative statements or judgments concerning objects, people, or events Affective Component The emotional or feeling segment of an attitude ( I don’t like John because he discriminates against minorities.”) Cognitive Component The opinion or belief segment of an attitude ( The belief that “discrimination is wrong” is a value example of the cognitive component of an attitude) Behavioural Component An intention to behave in a certain way toward someone or something ( I chose to avoid John because he discriminates) Attitudes
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4 Example: The Components of an Attitude Affective = feeling I dislike my supervisor! Behavioural = action I’m looking for other work Negative attitude towards supervisor Cognition, affect and behaviour are closely related Figure 3.1 Cognitive = evaluation My supervisor is unfair
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5 Cognitive Dissonance Any incompatibility between two or more attitudes or between behaviour and attitudes. People seek consistency among their attitudes, and between their attitudes and behaviour. They seek to reduce this gap, or ‘dissonance’. To reduce dissonance is determined by: The importance of the elements creating the dissonance, The degree of influence the individual has over the elements, and The rewards involved in the dissonance. The Theory of Cognitive Dissonance
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6 The Theory of Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive Dissonance If the elements creating dissonance are relatively unimportant the pressure to correct the imbalance will be low. When the elements are important, dissonance can be reduced
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This note was uploaded on 06/09/2009 for the course MANAGEMENT 2025MGT taught by Professor Davidponton during the One '08 term at Griffith.

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2025MGT Lecture 5 0802 - Chapter 3 Attitudes and Job...

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