09 - MIC170 4/28/09 Lecture 9 (Tuesday, 4/28) How does a...

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1 Lecture 9 (Tuesday, 4/28) How does a typical genetic study proceed? 1. Mutant isolation A. Mutagenesis --- discussed in the last lecture B. Correlation of phenotype with genotype 1) Tetrad analysis to confirm single mutation 2) Dominant/recessive test 3) Determination of complementation groups 4) Determine the identity of the gene carrying the mutation 1) Tetrad analysis to confirm single mutation --- continued What will happen if your mutant has more than one mutation? If mutant phenotype is caused by combination of two mutations, “a” and “b”, Assumption: Single mutation “a” wild-type phenotype Single mutation “b” wild-type phenotype Double mutation “a b” mutant phenotype Back-cross; Three possible segregation patterns i) AB (Phenotype: wt) AB (wt) ab (mutant) Parental ditype (PD) ab (mutant) =spore genotypes identical to parents’ ii) Ab (wt) Ab (wt) aB (wt) Non-parental ditype (NPD) aB (wt) = spore genotypes different from
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2009 for the course MIC 170 taught by Professor Shiozaki during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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09 - MIC170 4/28/09 Lecture 9 (Tuesday, 4/28) How does a...

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