Stereotyping and bias.edited.docx - Surname 1 Name of...

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Surname 1 Name of student Professor Course ID Date Stereotyping and bias in sports Stereotypes and media representations have continued to pass the message that physical activity/ sporting is a masculine activity. Stereotypes and social constraints are attached to cultural groups, affecting the behaviors and opportunities availed to participants. Gender stereotyping is the most rampant stereotype among athletes. Many blame the stereotypes on social constrains. For instance, it is common to hear the phrase “you throw like a girl." The dreaded insult brings the assumption that women have less physiological advantages compared to men. The epitomized statement becomes sexist influencing sports equality of the two genders. Various ideologies lead to stereotyping and bias: race, social class, sexuality, etc. Stereotypes threaten athletic performance. Both psychology and sociology contribute to the causal mechanisms of stereotyping and biases. Are stereotype threats viable in sports? Psychologists have through the years provided evidence that point to stereotyping undercutting performance in sports. Stereotypes have a negative appeal, especially towards the minority groups. To address the viability of stereotypes in sports, there needs to establish familiar stereotypes in sports. For an academic mind, a stereotype builds thinking: women are not athletic, white men can't jump, etc. Most of the sporting tasks are referenced in terms of
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Surname 2 sports intelligence and natural athletic ability. Depending on the ideology, it is set to harm the stereotyped group as opposed to engaging them. Stereotype threats are viable in sports. It exerts impact on cognitive and physical skills of the athlete. Stereotypes exert conscious control on the stereotyped. Negative stereotypes lead to doubt and susceptibility. Researches have indicated that this impacts self-worth (Beilock et al). Gender stereotyping Women are the largest victims of gender stereotyping. This has contributed to many of them boycotting some events to discourage various biases and pressure put on them. From a young age, society builds on the perception that physical; activity is mostly done by men (Brown et al., 463). This has led the idea that women cannot participate in particular sporting activity. The idea that women are not fast or strong has led to various biases such as limitation of testosterone levels. This has discredited some women from participating in their events with the idea that they do not ascribe to the “normal” required levels. It is such stereotypes that make women avoid taking part in sports such as football. In various cultures, women play given roles that men do not. This has contributed to sports being a male- dominated social activity. Men in sports thus wield authority over women participating in manipulation and consent. Throughout the decades, sports has been a hegemonic social intuition as a result of such bias (Yi-Hsiu et al., 5).
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  • Spring '08
  • Beilock

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