ppt_ch5 - CHAPTER 5 SOCIAL INTERACTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE...

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CHAPTER 5: SOCIAL INTERACTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE
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SOCIAL STRUCTURE An organized pattern of behavior that governs people's relationships Makes life orderly and predictable Includes statuses, roles, groups, organizations, and institutions 1
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Status —a social position Examples: student, professor, son, mother, employee Statuses can be ranked but do not always imply differing amounts of prestige. 2 Status
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Status set —a collection of social statuses that an individual occupies Changes throughout the life course Statuses are always relational. 2 Status Set
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Application List the statuses in your status set.
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An ascribed status is a position that we are born into Male; Latino; Female; Chinese An achieved status is a position that we have through choice Employee; Student; Dentist 2 Types of Status
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Application Identify whether it is ascribed or achieved: Twenty years of age African American Politician Mother Criminal
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Status inconsistency refers to occupying social positions that create conflict because they are ranked differently. A person who is both a student and an instructor may experience status inconsistency. 2 Status Inconsistency
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A role is the behavior expected of a person in a particular status. A student is expected to read, take notes, write papers, and attend class. Roles are based on mutual obligations.
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ppt_ch5 - CHAPTER 5 SOCIAL INTERACTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE...

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