PERCEPTION - PERCEPTION What is a perception Whereas sensation is a process of detecting transducing raw sensory information perception is the

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PERCEPTION What is a perception? Whereas sensation is a process of detecting, transducing raw sensory information, perception is the process of selecting, organizing and interpreting sensory data into a usable mental representation of the world. So perceptual process involves 3 major processes. 1. Selection 2. Organization 3. Interpretation pattern. 1. Selection There are constantly billions of sensory messages affecting sensory organs of the individual. The individual is not able to be attentive to all of the messages at the same time. This process of selection allows the individual to direct attention to the most important or critical aspect of the environment at any one time. There are special “Feature Detector” cell in our brain which distinguishes between different sensory inputs, and respond only to certain sensory information. In 1959, researchers discovered specialized nerve cells in the optic nerve cells of a frog, which they called “bug detectors” because they respond to only to moving bugs, and in the early 1960s, researchers found feature detectors in cats that respond to specific lines and angles. Similar studies with humans have found feature detectors in the temporal and occipital lobes.
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Certain basic mechanisms for perceptual selection are thus built into the brain, but a certain amount of interaction with the environment is apparently necessary for feature detector cells to develop normally. Habituation This is an important physiological process of our brain. Our brain is “prewired” to pay attention to the changes in the environment, than to stimuli that remain constant. For example, if you are listening to the music constantly, after a while you do not pay attention to it. But if there is a sudden noise you pay attention to the noise, because that is a change in environment. This is an example of habituation process. 2. Organization Once the incoming sensory information is selected, those information need to be organized into meaningful pattern to understand the world. There are certain principles or rules to organize that information. Those rules of organization are as follows. Form Constancy Depth Color. Form: The Gestalt Psychologists were the pioneers who formulated the principles of organizing sensory information in terms of Form. Their basic theory was that we perceive
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stimuli as a Whole in terms of Figure and Ground. According to them, we see the stimuli as a whole and not
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2009 for the course PSYCH 12295 taught by Professor Sadhana during the Spring '09 term at Delgado CC.

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PERCEPTION - PERCEPTION What is a perception Whereas sensation is a process of detecting transducing raw sensory information perception is the

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