103periodicprops

103periodicprops - Periodic Properties of Atoms Glenn V. Lo...

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    Periodic Properties of Atoms Glenn V. Lo Department of Physical Sciences Nicholls State University
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    Vocabulary Electron configuration: a listing showing the  orbitals assigned to electrons in an atom.  Examples: Ne: 1s 2  2s 2  2p 6   Na: 1s 2  2s 2  2p 6  3s 1 , or [Ne] 3s 1 Valence = outermost shell.   What is the valence shell of Na?  Answer: n=3 (the “third shell”) What is the valence configuration of Na?  Answer: 3s 1
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    Vocabulary Core electrons = inner electrons of an atom Row 2: core electrons = 2 innermost electrons;  represented by [He]; the “helium core” Row 3: core electrons = 10 innermost electrons;  represented by [Ne]; the “neon core” Etc. Consider the ground state of Ca: [Ar] 4s 2 How many electrons are in the core? What is the valence shell? How many valence electrons are there?
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    Transition Metals Consider the ground state of Fe  The atomic number if 26. The electron configuration is: [Ar] 4s 2  3d 6 Valence shell: n=4, not 3. Outermost (valence) electrons: two in the  4s orbital Six electrons in 3d subshell are inner  electrons; but generally not considered as  part of the “core”.
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    Trends in atomic sizes http://www.iun.edu/~cpanhd /C101webnotes/modern-atom same period (left-to- right): decreasing same group (top-to- bottom): increasing In which figure below is  the arrow pointing in the  direction of decreasing  size?
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    Trends in atomic sizes Same row (left-to-right):  generally decreasing.  Which is larger?  Na or Mg, N or F, K or Br NOTE: there is a  significant break in  trend among through  the transition metals http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/chemical/atomrad.html
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    Trends in atomic sizes Trend: same group (top-to-bottom) Generally increasing Which is larger? Na or K, N or P, C or Pb Arrange the following in order of  increasing size: Na, S, Cs Sr, I, Cl
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2009 for the course CHEM 105 taught by Professor Wessel during the Spring '08 term at Nicholls State.

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103periodicprops - Periodic Properties of Atoms Glenn V. Lo...

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