Readings on Gun Control .docx - District of Columbia law...

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District of Columbia law bans handgun possession by making it a crime to carry an unregistered firearm and prohibiting the registration of handguns; provides separately that no person may carry an unlicensed handgun, but authorizes the police chief to issue 1-year licenses; and requires residents to keep lawfully owned firearms unloaded and dissembled or bound by a trigger lock or similar device. Respondent Heller, a D.C. special policeman, applied to register a handgun he wished to keep at home, but the District refused. He filed this suit seeking, onSecond Amendmentgrounds, to enjoin thecity from enforcing the bar on handgun registration, the licensing requirement insofar asit prohibits carrying an unlicensed firearm in the home, and the trigger-lock requirementinsofar as it prohibits the use of functional firearms in the home. The District Court dismissed the suit, but the D.C. Circuit reversed, holding that theSecond Amendmentprotects an individual’s right to possess firearms and that the city’s total ban on handguns, as well as its requirement that firearms in the home be kept nonfunctional even when necessary for self-defense, violated that right.TheSecond Amendmentprotects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home. Pp.2–53.Like most rights, theSecond Amendmentright is not unlimited.The handgun ban and the trigger-lock requirement (as applied to self-defense) violate theSecond Amendment.Gun violence is a leading cause of premature death in the U.S. Guns kill more than 38,000 people and cause nearly 85,000 injuries each year. As a longtime advocate for violence prevention policies, APHA recognizes a comprehensive public health approachto addressing this growing crisis is necessary.The issue of gun violence is complex and deeply rooted in our culture, which is why we must take a public health approach to ensuring our families and communities are safe. We must place a renewed emphasis on improving gun injury and violence research.As the debate over how to reduce gun violence continuesin the wake of last month's deadly Parkland, Florida school shooting, new research is shedding light on the impact state laws may have on the number of gun-related deaths -- and what happens when gun control laws in one state are either stronger or weaker than their neighbors'.According to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were more than 36,200 deaths from firearms in the United States in
2015, with guns killing more people than motor vehicle crashes.While mass shootingstend to garner the most media attention, on average almost 100 people die each day in the United States from gun violence, including suicides, domestic violence, accidents, and local criminal incidents.

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