1 The Newsroom.docx - 1 The Newsroom Introduction Welcome to the television newsroom Around 3:30 p.m crews are returning from the field producers are

1 The Newsroom.docx - 1 The Newsroom Introduction Welcome...

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1 The Newsroom Introduction Welcome to the television newsroom. Around 3:30 p.m. crews are returning from the field, producers are getting their afternoon shows straightened up, reporters are writing scripts, and editors are hunting down video and getting it cut. It’s hard to find a place with more buzz and energy, but we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Let’s go back to the morning and a take a look at the jobs in a typical newsroom. In a smaller market, one person might perform several of these jobs, while bigger-market stations may divide one job among several people. Director
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The newscast director runs the booth. He or she calls the shots when the newscast airs and is the one making commands like, “Ready camera one—take!” Hours before, and during, the newscast the director works with the producer to make the producer’s plan a technical reality. The director may also supervise, train and schedule the rest of the crew. Technical Director This person sits in front of the video switcher and punches the buttons to bring up the cameras, video, graphics, and other sources. Audio Board Operator
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This person turns on the microphone when an anchor talks (and hopefully off when the anchor is done), lets the video and live sources be heard, and brings in the music. Teleprompter When the anchor looks right into the lens and speaks, they’re probably reading the script reflected over top of the lens. The prompter operator scrolls the words like movie credits (but much faster) keeping the lines in the right place to be read by the anchor. When you see an anchor suddenly stumble over their words and look down at their scripts a lot, something has gone wrong with the teleprompter. Studio Camera
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These are the people who move cameras around and set them up, mostly pointing at the anchors. The exceptions are close shots for things like cooking segments. Because the shots are consistent day after day, studio cameras are getting roboticized; this means one person can control several cameras remotely and automation may eliminate the controller position entirely. Floor Director
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This person is out in the studio with the anchors. He or she listens to the director’s cues on their headsets and conveys the information to the anchors, often non-verbally. For instance, if the newscast is showing video and the next thing on the rundown is the anchor talking into Camera two, the floor director will put a ready sign above Camera two. When the director calls “take” for Camera two, the floor director points to the lens purposefully, which lets the anchor know when and where to talk. All of the above jobs fall under news production. They put the newscast on the air live from the studio. The following jobs originate from the newsroom, but may go far beyond it.
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  • Spring '17
  • producer, Film producer, Newsroom, National Press Photographers Association, Professional video camera

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