Griswold Reading Notebook - Kimberly Fisher CHS 260 Reading...

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Kimberly FisherCHS 260February 20, 2018Reading Notebook Week 5Authors and Title: Richard Griswold del Castillo; Delgado, Perea, & Stefancic; Slavery & the Making of America- The Challenge of FreedomMain Argument: Signed on February 2, 1848, The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war between the United States and Mexico. As a result of the treaty, the United States acquired more than 500,000 square miles of vulnerable territory and emerged as a world power in the late nineteenth century. However, as Richard Griswold point out, articles calling for equality and protection of civil and property rights were either ignored or interpreted to favor those involved in the westward expansion of the United States rather than the Mexicans and Indians living in theconquered territories. Context: Richard Griswold del Castillo starts off contextualizing the text with The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the war between the United States and Mexico signed on February 2, 1848. He sees the violations of Mexican property rights and land claims, particularly in California, which led to years of legal battles. The unjust treatment was the first manifestation of a systematic inequality in relations between Anglo and Mexican Americans that continued intothe twenty-first century. Castillo is also contextualizing the text with the peaceful revolution in 1821 that Mexico achieved with independence from Spain. Key Concepts: Monroe DoctrineDefinition: The Monroe Doctrine is a policy stated by President Monroe in 1823, that the U.S. opposed further European colonization of and interference with independent nations in the Western Hemisphere. Example (if applicable): For example, the doctrine was originally intended to prevent any new Europe colonization in the new world. Europe today does not have the intention of engaging in colonial adventures in North or South America. America has largely violated the original intentions of the Monroe Doctrine on its own by trying to assure that the governments in Latin American are friendly to either American political or business interests. Significance: The Monroe Doctrine was a very important document. As the United States became more powerful, the Monroe Doctrine established its “rights” to exercise its influence over all of the Americans. This allowed it to do

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