parts_of_an_airplane_9-12.pdf - National Aeronautics and Space Administration GRADES 9-12 Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Museum in a BOX

parts_of_an_airplane_9-12.pdf - National Aeronautics and...

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Series Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate 9-12 GRADES parts of an airplane Parts of an Airplane National Aeronautics and Space Administration Museum in a B O X Series
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M U S E U M I N A B O X parts of an airplane 2 Parts of an Airplane Lesson Overview Objectives Students will: 1. Learn about the abilities of technological design and understandings about science and technology as they identify identify individual aircraft components, regardless of design or manufacturer. Materials: In the Box None Provided by User None GRADES 9-12 Time Requirements: 1 hour (Photo courtesy of NASA) In this lesson, students will learn about the abilities of technological design and understandings of science and technology as they analyze the individual components of an aircraft, first learning how to identify them, then gaining an understanding of how each component works.
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3 M U S E U M I N A B O X parts of an airplane Any vehicle, whether it’s a car, truck, boat, airplane, helicopter or rocket, is made up of many individual component parts. Some components are common amongst a variety of vehicles, while others are exclusive to specific types. Occasionally, a component is modified and given a different name, although its basic principle of operation remains intact. This lesson is designed to look at those individual components and allow students to not only identify them, but to understand how they work together to create a functioning aircraft. Figure 1 shows a typical airplane with its major components listed. Many external airplane components are constructed of metal alloys, although composites made of materials such as carbon fiber and a variety of fiberglass resins are becoming more popular as technology improves. Aileron The ailerons are located at the rear of the wing, typically one on each side. They work opposite to each other, meaning that when one is raised, the other is lowered. Their job is to increase the lift on one wing while reducing the lift on the other. By doing this, they roll the aircraft sideways, causing the aircraft to turn. This is the primary method of steering a fixed-wing aircraft. Antenna There are numerous radio antennas located around an aircraft, their size and position corresponding to the type of work each antenna must perform and the frequencies being transmitted or received. The GPS antenna, for example, is always mounted to the top of an airplane. This is because the GPS satellites are in Space, and therefore always above the aircraft. As a general rule, longer antennas are used for radio communication and navigation (VHF frequencies), while shorter antennas are reserved for higher frequency data such as the GPS signals and the transponder, which provides air traffic control with information about the aircraft’s position and altitude.
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  • Fall '17
  • Fixed-wing aircraft, Wing, Flap, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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