Descartes' Method - The Method of Descartes With the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Method of Descartes With the Renaissance in Europe came a renewed public interest in philosophy, as well as a revival of the stoic and skeptical schools of thought as a reaction to the long-accepted Aristotelian philosophy. Ren Descartes, though he received a classical education including Aristotles works, felt that much of what he learned had no foundation, and was thus worthless. The positions of skeptics and stoics were similarly unacceptable to Descartes, and so he pursued his own method of constructing a foundation for philosophy. As an accomplished and famous mathematician, Descartes sought to apply the incontrovertibility he found in logic, algebra and geometry to his philosophy. To do this, he needed to entirely reject everything that he knew to be true, and start entirely from scratch. Expecting the discovery of indisputable truth to be a long process, Descartes felt that he needed...
View Full Document

Page1 / 3

Descartes' Method - The Method of Descartes With the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online