Attention.pptx Day4.pptx - Attention Attention Attention...

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 37

This preview shows page 1 - 8 out of 37 pages.

Attention
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

Attention Attention: the means by which we process a limited amount of information selected from the enormous amount of information available through our senses There are seemingly endless stimuli, but humans have a finite cognitive capacity. How do we attend to what we need, but “block out” what we don’t need? Components: focusing and filtering 2
Image of page 2
Focusing
Image of page 3

Subscribe to view the full document.

Visual Attention Visual attention depends on visual focus. Attending to a visual stimulus requires focusing on it. Foveated stimuli may receive the most direct attention… But it’s possible to attend to the periphery, as well. The theories of attentional focus we’ll talk about rely on this assumption. Theories of attentional focus in a visual space 4
Image of page 4
Demo: Posner’s Cueing Task 5
Image of page 5

Subscribe to view the full document.

Spotlight Metaphor The spotlight metaphor suggests that attention is like a spotlight. We orient attention by moving the spotlight around. Posner (1980; Posner et al., 1980) developed the theory. When we focus visual attention to a specific stimulus or area, our focus is a circumscribed, specific region of space. Cues affect accuracy and reaction time on a perception task. Cue effects on attention to peripheral visual stimuli Do we need multiple spotlights? Split attention tasks: React to two separate stimuli in close-by nonadjacent spaces. We may need two “spotlights”, or we may adjust the size of the entire attention region (spotlight). 6
Image of page 6
Zoom Lens Metaphor The zoom lens metaphor suggests that attention is like a zoom lens. Eriksen & St. James (1986) proposed it as an alternative to the spotlight theory. Focus expands and contracts as necessary. There are cueing effects on the size of attentional field. Degree of “zoom”/attentional field size influences the density of attention resources. Density is also affected by the availability of attentional resources Availability of attentional capacity also determines density of focus.
Image of page 7

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 8
  • Fall '19
  • Eriksen, Broadbent, Distractor Effects

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes