Deliberative Speech (CN) - Y cannot be done i. X is...

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Deliberative Speech 1. The purpose of deliberation is to persuade the audience that a given course of action or policy will be better—more efficient, less costly, faster, more complete—than alternative actions in producing a desired result. Deliberative discourse is essentially an appeal for action, and deliberative propositions contend that “X ought to be done,” that “X is better than Y,” etc. 2. Time: We deliberate about matters in the future—about matters we can hope to change, or that we might want to maintain as they are. Deliberative speech recommends a future course of conduct as the best way to deal with some practical problem. 3. Main grounds of argument come from expert testimony, scientific evidence, past experience, etc., that can establish the probability that one policy or course of action will be better than others. 4. Main deliberative issues or levels of dispute: a. X can be done
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Unformatted text preview: Y cannot be done i. X is possible Y is not possible ii. X is practical Y is not practical b. X will be expedient, useful, effective, etc. Y would be inexpedient, useless, etc. c. X would be morally right, just, etc. Y would be unjust d. X will provide important results Y will produce insignificant results 5. Since a deliberative speech is designed, ultimately, to solve some practical problem, to eliminate some deficiency, or to secure some benefit, a possible organizational pattern is the need-plan-practicality pattern: Need : Show us that there is a problem and that it must be addressed. Plan : Explain exactly what your policy is and how it addresses this problem. Practicality : Reveal why this policy is best. Show us how this policy is feasible to implement, why it is not subject to the same defects or shortcomings that other policies are, why it will work, why it is just, etc....
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2008 for the course CAS 100A taught by Professor Schneider,lori during the Summer '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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