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18 DECOLONIZING METHODOLOGIES lived Research, eds M. M. Fonow and J. A. Cook, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. 6 Aga Khan, Sadruddin, and Hassan bin Talal (1987), I11{}igenous Peoples, a Global Qt«st for ]11stice: a Report for the Independent Commission on International H11manitarian Affairs, Zed Books, London. 7 For background see ibid. and Wilmer, F. (1993), Tbe Indigeno11s Voice in World Politics, Sage, California. 8 Burger, J. (1990), Tbe Gaia Alias of First Peoples, Gaia Books, London. 9 Wllmer, Tbe Indigeno11s Voit-e, p. 5. 10 I am not quite sure who said it first but several writers and texts have employed this concept in their tides and writing. Salman Rushdie wrote that the 'Empire. writes back to the center'. Mrican American women writers have taken the theme of 'talking back' or 'back chat' in similar ways to which Maori women speak of 'answering back'. Also important was a critical text on racism in Britain written by the Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies, University of Birmingham (1982): Tbe Empire Strikes Back: Race and &dsm in 1970s Britain, Hutchinson. 11 Nandy, A. (1989), The Intimate Ene"!J: Lo~,r and Recwery qf Sef 11nt4r Colonialism, Oxford University Press, Delhi 12 Memmi, A. (1965), The Colonii!r and the Coloni!{fd, expanded edition (1991), Beac~n Press Boston, pp. 79-89. 13 Maracle, L. (1996), I Am Woman.A Native Perspective on Sociolo!fY and Feminism, Press Gang Publishers, Vancouver, p. 21. 14 Johnston, P. and L. Pihama, (1994), 'The Marginalisati.on of Maori Women', in Hecate, Vol. 20, No.2, pp. 83-97. . 15 See for example, Smith, L. T. (1985), 'Te Rapunga I J'e Ao Maori', in Ism~ of Research and Maori, eds, G. H. Smith and M. K Hohepa, Research Unit for Maop Education, Education Department, University of Auckland. · · ·· 16 The term 'tribal' is problematic in the indigenous context but is used commonly in New Zealand to refer to large kinship-based, political groupings of Maori. Our· preferred. name for a 'tribe' is iwi. 17 Burger, Report From the Frontier, pp. 177-208. . 18 See, for example, essays by Spivak, Gayatri (1990), The Pqst-Colonial Criti<, ed. S. Harasym, Roudedge, New York. 19 Bishop, R. and T. Glynn (1992), 'He Kanohi Kitea: Conducting and Evaluating Educational Research', in Ne111 Zealand ]o11mal of Edllcational Stlldies, Vol 27, No.2, pp. 125-35. CHAPTER 1 Imperialism, History, Writing and Theory The master's tools wiU never dismantle the master's house.

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