Flash Cards - Real Estate Economics.pdf - Absorption Added Value Acceleration Clause Adequate Accession Rate Adjustable-rate Mortgage(ARM ADA Adjusted

Flash Cards - Real Estate Economics.pdf - Absorption Added...

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Absorption: Added Value: Acceleration Clause: Adequate: Accession Rate: Adjustable-rate Mortgage (ARM): ADA: Adjusted Cost Basis: Adaptive Zoning: Ad Valorem: 1a
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The practice of processing a resourcethrough additional steps in order togenerate additional wealth/jobs withina community before the resource issent outside the community.The measurement of the total square footage or unitsoccupied over a given period of time such as monthly orannually. This approach of measuring absorption only appliesto existing real estate as it serves as a baseline and would nottake into account units under construction. In analyzingabsorption, we examine the rate of which new homes are soldin a given geographical market area in comparison to the totalunits available for purchase. When absorption is high, thiscould lead to a depletion of the supply of homes in a givenmarket area.The threshold meeting minimumstandards established by eitherregulation, ordinance, code, policy, oraccepted standards.a. A provision in a real estate financing instrument that allowsthe lender to declare the remaining indebtedness due andpayable on the happening of certain conditions, such as thesale of the property or the borrower's default in payment. (RealEstate Principles, Real Estate Practice). b. The clause in amortgage or deed of trust that can be enforced to make theentire debt due immediately if the borrower defaults on aninstallment payment or other obligation. (Real EstateEconomics). c. The clause in a mortgage or trust deed thatstipulates the entire debt is due immediately if the mortgagordefaults under the terms of the contract. (Real Estate Finance).a. Finance instrument whose interest rate will vary according tothe change in an identified index or rate, such as the 11thDistrict Cost of Funds. (Real Estate Principles). b. A variable-interest-rate loan. (Real Estate Finance). c. A financingtechnique in which the lender can raise or lower the interestrate according to a set index, such as the rate on six-monthTreasury bills or the average cost of funds of FDIC-insuredinstitutions. (See also amortized mortgage.) (Fundamentals ofReal Estate Appraisal). d. A loan characterized by a fluctuatinginterest rate, usually one tied to a bank or savings and loanassociation cost-of-funds index. (Real Estate Economics).The number of employees added tothe payroll during a given period; animportant leading indicator of futurebusiness conditions.a. Purchase price of property plus cost ofspecified improvements, less anydepreciation deductions taken on theproperty. (Real Estate Principles) b. Thevalue on the books of a taxpayer, which isoriginal cost plus improvements lessdepreciation. (Real Estate Economics)Americans with Disabilities Act.a. A Latin phrase meaning "œaccording to value" that isused to describe a tax charged in relation to the value ofthe property taxed. (Real Estate Principles, Real EstatePractice). b. A Latin term meaning "œto value" or "œinproportion to the value." Used to describe taxes where
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