HIST2111SP-Week10B - Jeffersonian Revolution Signs of the...

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Jeffersonian Revolution
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Signs of the 19th Century Apparent in the 1790s 1. Western land speculation and rapid western migration 2. Costly Indian wars and use of diplomacy to buy time 3. The rapid incorporation of new states into the Union 4. Intense debates over immigration and naturalization 5. Emergence of rival political parties and partisan press 6. Urban ethnic voters appear as a key in close elections 7. Fear among whites of insurrections of enslaved workers 8. Eli Whitney’s cotton gin expands prospects for southern cotton 9. States’ Rights Doctrines of “interposition and nullification” 10. Industrialization -- Slater’s first textile mill in Pawtucket RI (1790) 11. Speculation about civil war and the break-up of the Union 12. New American identity of optimism, nationalism, Manifest Destiny
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Summary 1. The initial movement towards political parties was a result of ideological differences between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson; ( a ) Jefferson was pro-agricultural interests and Hamilton was pro-commercial interests ; ( b ) While Hamilton was in favor of protective tariffs, Jefferson opposed them 2. During Washington’s administration, Democratic Republican Societies were formed initially to ( a ) promote Republicanism and Democracy ; and ( b ) Disseminate Political Information . A. However, they increasingly became Critical of Washington’s Administration B. Out of these Societies emerged Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican party 3. In their written response to the Alien and Sedition Acts (1798), Thomas Jefferson ( writing for Kentucky ) and James Madison ( writing for Virginia ) laid the theoretical framework for the “States’ Rights” doctrine of nullification, by declaring that individual states had the right to declare federal measures “void and of no force” 4.
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