128045632-An-analysis-of-Raymond-Carver-s-Cathedral.odt - 2...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 2 pages.

2 February 2013 An Analysis of Raymond Carver's “Cathedral” The narrator of Raymond Carver's “Cathedral” is, at the beginning of the story, an ignorant, imperfect person, as shown through his many stereotypical preconceptions, his wife's frustration with him, and his failure to self-actualize, but while he is illustrating the magnificence of a cathedral, with Robert, the narrator sees the world anew; he sees it with open eyes; he reaches sublimity, and all of the unreasonable stereotypes that he had believed in mere moments before are swept away. Surely, Carver purposely paints the main character as a villain so that he can later show that the man has changed for the better. For example, the narrator treats Robert improperly, though blind people are usually pitied, and makes a racist comment about a “negro,” which serves to incite his wife's wrath (Carver 3). Also, he states that he does not like his work but has been in his current position for three years. These poor qualities of his are obliterated when

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture