The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time manages to show how this idea affects people who l - Title Page:The Curious Incident of the Dog in the

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time manages to show how this idea affects people who l

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Title Page:The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Course Name: English 1170 Instructor Name: Mr. David Wilson Student Name:Stephenique Jones Due Date:November 30th 2018 While trust is a somewhat common theme in modern novels, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time manages to show how this idea affects people who live under atypical circumstances. Haddon tells the story through the eyes of Christopher, a fifteen-year-old autistic boy whose view of life, as well as his understanding of the world, is drastically different from that of any other teenager. Christopher is extremely sensitive, and is only comfortable in familiar surroundings and with familiar people. His daily routine consists of a series of complicated systems and he is very deeply affected when treated badly by other people. The book's two major themes come into play when Christopher must begin to face the real, adult world. here is a special type of first-person narrative that requires the reader to supply what the narrator cannot understand. Much of what "happens" in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is not grasped by Christopher, its narrator. The reader comprehends, as Christopher never will, the farcical drama of parental discord that he witnesses. Even when he discovers the truth about his mother, but living in London with a lover, he has no idea of his father's reasons for lying (his cowardice and protectiveness). Christopher, the book jacket tells you, has Asperger's syndrome, though this is never named in the novel. He has no understanding of others' emotions, though he doggedly records their symptoms. "He
Title Page:The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Course Name: English 1170 Instructor Name: Mr. David Wilson Student Name:Stephenique Jones Due Date:November 30th 2018 looked at me for a long time and sucked air in through his nose," he observes, when his father is, we infer, near despair. Yet requiring the reader to fill in these gaps allows for a tragicomic intuition of characters' feelings that a more adequate narrator could not manage. The "inadequate narrator" is not an established critical term. Yet the more usual "unreliable narrator" seems inaccurate for a narrator who, however un-comprehending, is entirely trustworthy. We are not invited to be sceptical about what Christopher tells us. As he says several times, "I always tell the truth". Indeed, his very truthfulness is a kind of limitation on his understanding of the world. He cannot negotiate his way through conversations. Christopher's peculiar ingenuousness is as much fictional device as medical condition. You do not have to check him against a psychiatric textbook to believe in him as a narrator. The reader is left to piece together the meanings and motives of the characters around him; he never explains or interprets. "When I was little I didn't understand about other people having minds... But I don't find this difficult now." He has decided to turn life into a detective story, for "if something is a puzzle there is always a way of solving it".

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