CollegeBn2006-08.pdf - INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 2006\u20132008 College of Arts and Sciences Bloomington Campus www.indiana.edu\/~college When you become

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Unformatted text preview: INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 2006–2008 College of Arts and Sciences Bloomington Campus When you become a student at Indiana University, you join an academic community internationally known for the excellence and diversity of its programs. Indiana University is one of the nation’s oldest and largest state universities, with eight campuses serving nearly 100,000 students. IU also offers courses through facilities at Columbus, Elkhart, and many other sites. Indiana University Campuses Indiana University Bloomington Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis Indiana University East (Richmond) Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne Indiana University Kokomo Indiana University Northwest (Gary) Indiana University South Bend Indiana University Southeast (New Albany) INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 2006–2008 College of Arts and Sciences Bloomington Campus Indiana University, a member of the North Central Association (NCA), is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission: ; (312) 263-0456. While every effort is made to provide accurate and current information, Indiana University reserves the right to change without notice statements in the bulletin series concerning rules, policies, fees, curricula, or other matters. ii Administration Indiana University ADAM W. HERBERT, Ph.D., President of the University KENNETH R. R. GROS LOUIS, Ph.D., University Chancellor CHARLES R. BANTZ, Ph.D., Executive Vice President and Chancellor, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis D. CRAIG BRATER, M..D., Vice President and Dean and Walter J. Daly Professor, School of Medicine J. TERRY CLAPACS, M.B.A., Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer THOMAS C. HEALY, Ph.D., Vice President for Government Relations MICHAEL A. McROBBIE, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Bloomington CHARLIE NELMS, Ed.D., Vice President for Institutional Development and Student Affairs JUDITH G. PALMER, J.D., Vice President and Chief Financial Officer MICHAEL M. SAMPLE, B.A., Vice President for University Relations MARYFRANCES McCOURT, M.B.A., Treasurer of the University DAVID J. FULTON, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University East MICHAEL A. WARTELL, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne RUTH J. PERSON, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University Kokomo BRUCE W. BERGLAND, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University Northwest UNA MAE RECK, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University South Bend SANDRA R. PATTERSON-RANDLES, Ph.D., Chancellor of Indiana University Southeast Bloomington Campus MICHAEL A. McROBBIE, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Bloomington JEANNE SEPT, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculties EDWARDO L. RHODES, Ph.D., Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Support and Diversity NEIL D. THEOBALD, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor for Budgetary Administration and Planning ROLAND A. COTE, M.A., Interim Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services RICHARD N. McKAIG, Ed.D., Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Dean of Students College of Arts and Sciences DAVID ZARET, Ph.D., Interim Dean ROBERT BECKER, Ph.D., Executive Associate Dean CATHERINE LARSON, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education EMÍLIA P. MARTINS, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Program Development ANNIE LANG, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Research and Grants RANDOLPH PARKER, Ph.D., Executive Assistant Dean KIRSTINE LINDEMANN, Ph.D., Senior Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Academic Affairs CATHARINE M. HOFF, Ph.D., Academic Assistant Dean and Coordinator of Advising W. DAVID HALLORAN, Ph.D., Academic Assistant Dean and Coordinator of Student Retention MITCHELL BYLER, M.M., Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies LYNN DI PIETRO, M.A., Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies ULRIK KNUDSEN, B.S., Director of Computer Information Technology Office Indiana University chose to print this bulletin with soy-based ink on recycled paper, both of which are more environmentally sound than traditional printing materials. You can make another sound choice. Please recycle this bulletin. iii Table of Contents 1 Degree Requirements 2 Liberal Learning at Indiana University 3 The College of Arts and Sciences: The Tradition 3 Admission to Indiana University 4 Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Policies of Indiana University 4 Entering the College of Arts and Sciences 4 Transfer Students 5 Students with Learning Disabilities 5 Degrees and Majors Offered 7 General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees 8 Course Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 9 Fundamental Skills Requirements 11 Distribution Requirements 11 Culture Studies Requirement 12 Major Concentration Requirements (B.A.) 13 College of Arts and Sciences Optional Minors 13 Completing Minor Requirements 14 Courses Outside the College of Arts and Sciences 14 Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.) 14 Student Information 14 Program Planning and Counseling Guidelines 15 Academic Regulations 17 Academic Standing of Students 18 Restart Policy 18 Special Opportunities for Students 24 Student Records 24 Explanation of Abbreviations 26 Departments, Programs, and Course Descriptions 27 African American and African Diaspora Studies 35 African Studies 38 American Studies 41 Animal Behavior 43 Anthropology 54 Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design 59 Astronomy 62 Biology 74 Central Eurasian Studies 80 Chemistry 87 Chicano-Riqueño Studies 88 Classical Studies 93 Cognitive Science 99 Communication and Culture 105 Comparative Literature 111 Computer Science 115 Criminal Justice 120 East Asian Languages and Cultures 130 Economics 135 English 142 Environmental Science 144 Film Studies 145 Fine Arts (History) 146 Fine Arts (Studio) 158 Folklore and Ethnomusicology 162 170 174 179 185 190 204 208 209 213 214 217 225 230 231 232 234 239 249 251 255 260 265 274 275 284 291 295 295 302 309 315 321 329 334 342 342 342 342 343 343 343 343 343 344 344 345 345 345 346 346 347 348 348 349 349 350 351 351 352 French and Italian Gender Studies Geography Geological Sciences Germanic Studies History History and Philosophy of Science Human Biology India Studies Individualized Major Program International Studies Program Jewish Studies Latin American and Caribbean Studies Latino Studies Leadership, Ethics, and Social Action Liberal Arts and Management Program Linguistics Mathematics Medieval Studies Near Eastern Languages and Cultures Philosophy Physics Political Science Poynter Center Psychological and Brain Sciences Religious Studies Russian and East European Institute Second Language Studies Slavic Languages and Literatures Sociology Spanish and Portuguese Speech and Hearing Sciences Telecommunications TESOL Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (See “Second Language Studies”) Theatre and Drama West European Studies Special Courses and Programs Arts and Sciences Career Services Direct Admit Program Experimental Courses Foreign Study Freshman Interest Groups Program Freshman Seminars Groups Student Support Services Program Hutton Honors College Individual Readings and Research Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity Intensive Freshman Seminars Living-Learning Centers Collins Living-Learning Center Foster International Global Village McNair Scholars Program MEDIC-B Scholars Program (See “Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity”) Special Skills Courses The Topics Program Additional Programs Approved Outside Minors Kelley School of Business Dentistry Earth Science Education vi 353 353 356 356 357 357 358 360 360 361 362 363 365 Environmental Studies Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Informatics Journalism Labor Studies Medicine Jacobs School of Music Optometry School of Public and Environmental Affairs Social Work Studying Abroad Urban Studies Indiana University 365 General Policies 365 Undergraduate Admissions Policy 366 Transfer to Other Indiana University Campuses 367 Residency Status 369 Fees 373 Appendices 373 Appendix I: Culture Studies Requirement Lists 380 Appendix II: Approved Distribution Courses 391 Appendix III: Topics-Qualified Courses 393 Index Degree Requirements Degree Requirements 2 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 7 8 9 11 11 12 13 13 14 14 14 15 17 18 18 24 Liberal Learning at Indiana University The College of Arts and Sciences: The Tradition Admission to Indiana University Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Policy of Indiana University Entering the College of Arts and Sciences Transfer Students Students with Learning Disabilities Degrees and Majors Offered General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees Course Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Fundamental Skills Requirements Distribution Requirements Culture Studies Requirement Major Concentration Requirements (B.A.) College of Arts and Sciences Optional Minors Completing Minor Requirements Courses Outside the College of Arts and Sciences Student Information Program Planning and Counseling Guidelines Academic Regulations Academic Standing of Students Restart Policy Special Opportunities for Students Student Records Photography compliments of the College of Arts and Sciences, the IU Office of Creative Services, and Chris Meyer. INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN OFFICIAL SERIES (USPS 262440) ISSN 0-888-5338 Periodicals postage paid at Bloomington, Indiana. Published six times a year (two times in June and December; one time in September and October) by Indiana University from the Office of Creative Services, Poplars 721, 400 E. Seventh Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-3085. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN MAIL ROOM, Ashton-Weatherly Lounge, 400 N. Sunrise Drive, Bloomington, IN 47408. Vol. CIV, No. 1 Bloomington, Indiana June 2006 1 2 Liberal Learning at Indiana University Liberal Learning at Indiana University At the core of Indiana University, as at all distinguished universities and undergraduate institutions, is the College of Arts and Sciences. The College provides the means for undergraduates to acquire a liberal arts education: an education that broadens the student’s knowledge and awareness in the major areas of human knowledge, significantly deepens that awareness in one or two fields, and prepares the foundation for a lifetime of continual learning. The distinguishing mark of the university is that its faculty are engaged in the discovery and dissemination of knowledge, thereby offering students an unusually rich opportunity to gain a liberal education. A liberal arts education begins with the premise that one’s world and one’s self are worth knowing. To understand our world, we must know something about its physical, biological, cognitive, social, cultural, and spiritual dimensions. The liberal arts provide these perspectives on knowledge to serve as the basis for a full and effective professional and personal life. No better preparation for success in the professions exists than a strong liberal arts education, and our experience demonstrates that the liberal arts help develop the rigor of mind needed for advanced study in any field and for the pursuit of a richer life through the enlargement of mind and spirit. By its very name, a liberal arts education suggests that broadness of study is a primary concern. It inspires openness and breadth of mind, regard for values unlike our own, and respect for the creative processes of diverse disciplines. The liberal arts emphasize cultural, social, and biological change and assess the impact of technological progress on the world’s environment. They generate appreciation and understanding of many societies’ past accomplishments and provide the basis for future insight and enterprise. At Indiana University, the liberal arts curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences directs its students to achieve 11 major goals: 1. Our students must achieve the genuine literacy required to read and listen effectively, and to speak and write clearly and persuasively. 2. The liberal arts teach students to think critically and creatively. As perceptive analysts of what they read, see, and hear, students must learn to reason carefully and correctly and to recognize the legitimacy of intuition when reason and evidence prove insufficient. 3. By gaining intellectual flexibility and breadth of mind, liberal arts students remain open to new ideas and information, willing to grow and learn, and sensitive to others’ views and feelings. 4. The curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences helps students discover ethical perspectives, so that they can formulate and understand their own values, become aware of others’ values, and discern the ethical dimensions underlying many of the decisions they must make. 5. A quality liberal arts education includes an appreciation of literature and the arts and the cultivation of the aesthetic judgment that makes possible the enjoyment and comprehension of works of the creative imagination. 6. Liberal arts students must understand and practice scientific methods; this approach to knowledge forms the basis of scientific research; guides the formation, testing, and validation of theories; and distinguishes conclusions that rest on unverified assertion from those developed through the application of scientific reasoning. 7. Mathematical and statistical studies teach arts and sciences students to reason quantitatively, a skill essential in an increasingly technological society. 8. A liberal education must develop historical consciousness, so that students can view the present within the context of the past, appreciate tradition, and understand the critical historical forces that have influenced the way we think, feel, and act. 9. The College of Arts and Sciences emphasizes the study of the international community and encourages students to become involved in the contemporary world. By understanding the range of physical, geographic, economic, political, religious, and cultural realities influencing world events, students cultivate an informed sensitivity to global and environmental issues. 10. Students in the liberal arts develop basic communication skills in at least one foreign language, providing the fundamental skills for communicating with people from other cultures and offering insights into other patterns of thought and modes of expression. 11. The breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education requires an indepth knowledge of at least one subject to be complete. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences must learn to acquire and manage a coherent, sophisticated understanding of a major body of knowledge with all its complexities, power, and limitations. Admission to Indiana University The liberal arts education of the College of Arts and Sciences provides the fundamental knowledge, skills, and experience essential for a full, rich, and rewarding life. Such an education taps many of the capacities that we as human beings possess. It offers us fuller lives, in understanding and expressing ourselves and in relating to others. These arts and sciences are preprofessional in the best sense. They serve as a foundation for many professions, many ways of earning a living. More than training for today’s occupations, a liberal arts education offers students the foresight and flexibility they will need as they move on to careers and technologies not yet known or imagined. Finally, a liberal arts education develops the qualities of mind that are needed by informed and responsible people. Any decision or action— whether personal or professional—informed by knowledge, rationality, and compassion makes the greatest contribution to a better world. The College of Arts and Sciences: The Tradition The education offered by the College of Arts and Sciences is based on a tradition established when Indiana University was founded in 1820 as a liberal arts institution. What are now departments in the College served then as the core of the university from which all the other schools and units developed. Today the College continues its central role in the mission of Indiana University. The College not only offers more than 50 baccalaureate majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, and the Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees, but it also provides much of the general education for undergraduate students in the Schools of Continuing Studies; Education; Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; Informatics; Journalism; Public and Environmental Affairs; Social Work; the Kelley School of Business, and the Jacobs School of Music. At the heart of the College’s tradition is excellence in teaching based on excellence in research. College faculty who are at the forefront of their disciplines teach at all levels of the curriculum, from freshman through senior and graduate courses. Although the content of courses has changed as society has changed and knowledge has developed, the College faculty has always sought to provide students with specialized knowledge in a major field of study that is enriched by a broad liberal arts education. For more than 185 years, the mission of the faculty has been to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and perspectives to help them develop an 3 understanding of themselves and the world around them through a combination of specialized and general study. The present degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences relate these principles to the modern world. Fundamental skills courses in writing, mathematics, and foreign language provide opportunities for students to develop communication and computational skills for use in their own society as well as for use in understanding other societies. The Topics curriculum and distribution requirements are designed for students to acquire broad familiarity with the general areas of human knowledge by taking courses in the arts and humanities, social and historical studies, and natural and mathematical sciences. The culture studies requirement enables students to enrich their understanding of their neighbors in a shrinking world. These courses serve as the foundation upon which students can develop a major program of study. Because of the richness and diversity of its more than 50 majors, the College offers students a variety of counseling services to help them take full advantage of their opportunities at Indiana University. Academic assistant deans in the College can answer specific questions or talk with students about their goals. Academic advisors in each department in the College are eager to help students understand the special requirements and options of the department, and are also happy to discuss general degree requirements and the best options for their completion. Finally, counselors in Arts and Sciences Career Services in the Career Development Center will help students understand how to combine their liberal arts education and their career goals in satisfying employment. Admission to Indiana University Most incoming freshmen admitted to Indiana University first enter the University Division, which provides them with academic advising. Because freshmen are not usually admitted directly into a major, all freshmen are expected to meet the admission standards outlined in the freshman application materials. These materials and additional information are available from: Office of Admissions 300 N. Jordan Avenue Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405 (812) 855-0661 Web site: 4 Entering the College of Arts and Sciences International students should request the International Application for Admission from: advisor or go to the University Division Records Office, Maxwell Hall 030. International Admissions 300 N. Jordan Avenue Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405 (812) 855-4306 Web site: Changing Majors Once in the College of Arts and Sciences, students who wish to change their majors should see the College advisor for the new major they want. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Policy of Indiana University Indiana University pledges itself to continue its commitment to the achievement ...
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  • Fall '16
  • Academic degree, Bachelor's degree, Bachelor of Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Arts

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