History Report - Chris Hazlewood Hist 105 Starr Report on...

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Chris Hazlewood Hist. 105 – Starr Report on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass In the Narrative of Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass gives a first-hand account of how slave life was for him personally. This narrative was not written until after he had escaped the evils of slavery, and become a free slave. Even with that, this narrative serves as a tool to better understand the beginnings of our current society, as well as to show how cruel we as humans once were. In addition to providing a summary of the novel, this report also looks into the use of ignorance in the narrative. The narrative begins with Douglass giving a history of himself as best he can since slaves were not permitted to know most of this knowledge including their age, parents, and many other facts that one would normally know about themselves. When Douglass is an infant, he is separated from his mother and sees the reasoning for this to be “to hinder the development of the child’s affection toward its mother” (42). And probably around seven years after their separation, his mother dies. The only thing he knows of his father is that he is white; however, he is constantly told that his master is his father which he sees as understandable since he knows of masters raping their female slaves. His first master is Captain Anthony to which Douglass attributes traits of cruelty and drunkenness. It is with this master that Douglass witnesses his first whipping, which is suffered by his Aunt Hester. It is at Captain Anthony’s farm that Douglass meets Mr.
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