PHYS 201 Manual v1.16.pdf - Physics 201 Lab Manual Spring...

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Physics 201 Lab Manual Spring 2019 Version 1.16
Lab Schedule Date Lab Title Openstax Chapters August 20-22 No Labs August 27-29 Motion along a Straight Line Ch. 2 September 3-5 Free Fall Ch. 2 September 10-12 Projectile Motion Ch. 3 September 17-19 Newton’s Second Law Ch. 4 September 24-26 Simple Pendulum Ch. 1 October 1-3 Newton’s Third Law, Impulse and Momentum Ch. 4,8 October 8-10 Work and Energy Ch. 7 October 15-17 Buoyancy Ch. 11 October 22-24 Rotational Dynamics (Force, Torque) Ch. 10 October 29-31 No Labs November 5-7 Spring-Mass Oscillations Ch. 16 November 12-14 Vibrating Strings Ch. 16 November 19-21 Ballistic Pendulum Ch. 8 November 26-28 No Labs (Thanksgiving Break) December 3-5 Makeup Labs i
Contents Lab Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Lab Syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Lab Notes and Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii 0. Intro to Work in Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1. Motion in a Straight Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2. Free Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3. Projectile Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 4. Newton’s Second Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 5. Simple Pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 6. Newton’s Third Law and Momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 7. Work and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 8. Buoyancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 9. Rotational Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 10. Spring-Mass Oscillations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 11. Vibrating Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 12. Ballistic Pendulum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Uncertainty and Graphical Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Computer Tools for Data Acquisition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Excel Spreadsheets and Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 List of All Rubrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 ii
Lab Syllabus Lab Director Jacob Turner Office Webster Hall Room 341 Phone (509) 335-3398 Email [email protected] The majority of students who fail the lab do so for having failed to understand the contents of this syllabus. Read carefully, email with any questions Goals: To apply what you learn in the lecture, you will need some skills and concepts that are best learned in the laboratory. These skills include model building, data collection and analysis, laboratory record keeping, and formal reporting of results. You will also need enough statistics to perform elementary hypothesis testing. These skills apply to quantitative work in many fields, including the health- and life-sciences, math, and engineering. Although these activities should improve your understanding of the lecture material, our principle goal is to turn theory into practice. Most students in introductory physics courses have had lab experience in chemistry and other disciplines. We build on that experience. Your teaching assistants will not be as specific about their requirements as your chemistry teaching assistants may have been. You will often be expected to figure things out on your own in consultation with your lab partner, but you will be graded by the rubrics – which can help to provide some guidance. Since you will be working more independently, you will be required to document your work more carefully, with less input from your teaching assistant. To accomplish these goals, you will be expected to: • Apply physics in a variety of physical settings. • Build simple mathematical models. • Design experiments. • Document your experimental work, results, and data analysis in lab notes and notebooks. • Evaluate and compare results using uncertainties. • Employ representative software packages for data collection and analysis.

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