History Timeline.pdf - Interactive Timeline A Voyage...

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Interactive Timeline: A Voyage Through History Julia Shcherban Set the Stage → It has been confirmed by the House of Commons Special Committee that the most neglected social group in Canada’s society is Aborigonal peoples. From 1876 to 1927 First Nations had to live in difficult conditions because of the restrictive regulations of the Indian Act. The Indian Act allowed the government to control most aspects of aboriginal life including Indian status, land, resources, education and spiritual and religious traditions. First Nations were treated as less than Canadian citizens and their culture was not respected whatsoever. The Act gave the Federal Department of Indian Act much more authority so they had the power to promote civilization and assimilation by forcing First Nations to abandon their traditions and forcing their children to be sent away to residential schools. Residential schools caused a lot of trauma to children as they were forced to forget their language and culture, lived in poor conditions, were abused and taken away from their families. Despite the First Nations having to deal with this poor treatment for decades, many still supported Canada and fought during the First and Second World War as well as the Korean War. By the late 1940s, many social and political changes took place which started changed the lives of First Nations in Canada. First Nations leaders brought the fact that First Nations were supportive during the wars and the fact that they were rightful citizens that were treated poorly to light. This changed their lives and was the start of the changes in their rights and their freedom. Timeline Event Write Ups → 1. The First Nations nutrition experiments - 1942 The First Nations nutrition experiments were experiments done by the Department of Health in Canada. These experiments were highly unethical and classified as genocide. It used hungry aboriginal children from poor communities in Manitoba and from residential schools all over the country to figure out the importance of vitamins and supplements. No such consent was given to the researchers from the subjects or the parents of the subjects. The children were tested on without knowing, some children were given vitamins and some were not and the results were recorded. Certain mixtures of vitamins were given to some children but not others to see if the vitamins mitigated any issues, none of them did. As well, children that initially had access to things such as dental care, during the experiments they were not allowed access, to see the effect of the vitamins on gingivitis. The experiments continued even if though children died, even after recommendations from the Nuremberg trials, these experiments went on till 1952. At this time, Aboriginals were not treated as equals or as Canadian citizens and Aboriginals did not have rights, so they felt it was understandable to perform these experiments on them. This event is very significant because once this string of events was released to the public, it was viewed as genocide and very unethical, so there was a shift in thinking about how aboriginals should be treated.
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