Wordsworth and Byron.docx - Alissa Colaruotolo Mrs Egan AP...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Alissa ColaruotoloMrs. EganAP Literature & Composition, period 322 February 2017Wordsworth: P 550-558 #1-91.At the beginning of the poem, the speaker is experiencing the countryside, declaring that fivelong years have passed since he last visited. The speaker describes the scenery around him: the“steep and lofty cliffs” impress upon him “thoughts of more deep seclusion”; he leans against thedark sycamore tree and looks at the cottage-grounds and the orchard trees, whose fruit is stillunripe. He sees the “wreaths of smoke” rising up from cottage chimneys between the trees, andimagines that they might rise from “vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods,” or from the caveof a hermit in the deep forest. 2.The speaker has lost his childhood innocence since he first “came among these hills”. 3.The speaker sees the childhood innocence in his “dear Sister” that makes him more aware of what he “was once”. Dorothy reacts to nature in the same wat that Wordsworth did five years ago, so Wordsworth is comparing the current Dorothy to his past self.4.By “the burden of mystery”, Wordsworth is referring to everything that people question about life. Wordsworth, when remembering the peacefulness of nature five years ago, no longer struggles with questions about life and its meaning, making the mystery of the existence of people and the burden of this mystery lighter. Therefore, the mysteries are burdens because the purpose and meaning of people pose unanswerable questions.5.The “gifts” and “abundant recompense” the speaker believes he has received for his “loss” is maturity and a deeper understanding of nature.6.When Wordsworth says that he has heard “the still, sad music of humanity”, he means that he haslost his innocence and perhaps fell into despair.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture