sonnets questions.docx - Alissa Colaruotolo Mrs Egan AP...

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Alissa Colaruotolo Mrs. Egan AP Literature & Composition, period 3 28 November 2016 P 279 #1-5 1. The speaker finds himself envying what others have, and in lines 5-9 he sees almost everyone as having something he lacks. He wishes to be like "one more rich in hope," perhaps meaning hopeful or literally wealthy; "featured like him," refers to someone who is handsome, with beautiful features; and another is "with friends possessed," or popular, unlike the poet (as has been established in the first two lines). In line 7, he envies the artistic talent of one man, and the opportunities afforded someone else. 2. In Sonnet 29 by William Shakespeare the speaker describes moments of great sadness, in which he cries over his "outcast state" by himself. The "turn" at the beginning of the third quatrain occurs when the poet by chance happens to think upon the young man to whom the poem is addressed, which makes him assume a more optimistic view of his own life. The speaker likens such a change in mood "to the lark at break of day arising, From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate". 3. The speaker’s tone changes from sullen to joyous simply by thinking of the woman. The turning point is in line 9, "Yet in these thoughts..." That word "yet" is a big clue, and the transformation is not

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