Week 4 Lesson 2_ The Urinary System_ Basic Medical Terminology - 10547.pdf - Week 4 Lesson 2 The Urinary System TABLE OF CONTENTS Digestive System

Week 4 Lesson 2_ The Urinary System_ Basic Medical Terminology - 10547.pdf

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Week 4 Lesson 2: The Urinary System TABLE OF CONTENTS Digestive System, Urinary System Introduction Note! Please note, many of the bold words in this overview display hidden content when you roll your mouse over them. Digestive System Another name for the digestive system is the alimentary canal. "Aliment" is the French word that means food. The digestive system (also called the gastrointestinal tract) has three important functions: 1. Breaks complex food substances down into smaller units; 2. Absorbs the smaller units, the nutrients, into the bloodstream as an energy source; 3. Eliminates the waste material (what cannot be digested) from the body. The Steps in Digestion Chewing breaks food into smaller parts, mixes it with saliva, and begins the breakdown of starches. Swallowing moves food into the esophagus and on into the stomach. The churning action of the stomach further breaks down the food and mixes it with gastric juices. The result is a semifluid mass called "chyme". Chyme moves into the small intestine where pancreatic juice and bile from the liver are added to the mix. Further digestion occurs and most of the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream from the small intestine. The large intestine receives the fluid waste products of digestion. Water is absorbed from the waste. Solid wastes are formed and stored, ready for elimination as feces. Digestion begins once food is placed in the oral cavity, which includes the mouth and the accessory organs - the tongue and teeth. Through chewing and through the action of saliva, food is mechanically and chemically broken down. A bolus (small rounded mass of food) is formed.
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  • Spring '19
  • Rousse, Justin R.
  • renal pelvis

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