Lecture One of the problems with the politically correct...

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SOCS 350N Week 7; Quiz # 4 Introduction Forming strategies to deal with diversity issues can be a tricky business. The popular approach today is political correctness, which unfortunately, is often neither political nor correct. This is not to say that it is acceptable to behave or speak in a disrespectful manner to or about other persons, or to tolerate overt discrimination against others. What it does mean is that we should be focusing on the underlying power associated with these terms, attitudes, & behaviors. An example is the current view of the use of the n- word. It is considered so demeaning & insulting that it cannot even be spoken aloud, yet everyone knows exactly what the n-word is. The point is that it isn't the word, but rather the cultural underst&ings & reactions that are conjured up by the single letter n . What we have done is to simply replace one word with another without changing the underlying meaning & power of the term. It seems that many think that by making the speaking of the word taboo, the racist meaning behind it no longer exists. Unfortunately, nothing is that simple. A Class Divided - PBS Frontline Video Please click on the link to view the PBS Frontline video titled A Class Divided . Step 1 To begin, we must look within our own social & cultural underst&ings. We all have prejudices & ideological values about ourselves & others, & we talked about these in a previous
lecture. One of the problems with the politically correct approach is that it labels people whose underst&ings do not conform to doctrine as either racist or sexist. This amounts to trying to eliminate derogatory stereotyping by applying derogatory stereotypes & is; therefore, just as likely to arouse resentment & resistance in the dominant group as it is in any minority group. The first step is to overcome the reluctance to admit that we base our reactions to, or underst&ings of, minority groups on values & assumptions that may not be accurate or factual. As was pointed out earlier in the course, much of what we know comes from a very limited set of information sources. Most people with whom we interact regularly are more like ourselves than not, & we tend to place value & acceptability on those things that are familiar & comfortable. Our educational system has for many years placed White, middle-class, & mostly male ideals, achievements, & values at the core of our curriculums. Much of what is learned about minorities is negative, in the sense that they are presented as subordinate groups who performed menial tasks & are often portrayed as simple, child-like people who needed care & nurturing. Little mention was made of people such as Dr. Charles Drew, Elijah McCoy, Otis Boykin, Garrett Morgan, Henrietta Bradberry, or George Grant (look these names up). Start thinking about how you really feel about issues involving minority relations & diversity. How much is based on empirical data that can be verified & how much on assumptions based on your own experiences? When you read or hear about the contributions of minority group members (such as those

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