Apology of Socrates - Project Gutenberg's Apology, Crito,...

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Unformatted text preview: Project Gutenberg's Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Socrates, by Plato This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Socrates Author: Plato Release Date: October 12, 2004 [EBook #13726] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK APOLOGY, CRITO, AND PHAEDO *** Produced by Ted Garvin, Jussi Kukkonen and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team. Plato's Apology, Crito And Phdo Of Socrates. Literally Translated By Henry Cary, M.A., Worcester College, Oxford With An Introduction By Edward Brooks, jr. Contents. Introduction The Apology Of Socrates Introduction to the crito Crito; Or, The Duty Of A Citizen Introduction To The Phdo Phdo; Or, The Immortality Of The Soul Introduction. Of all writers of speculative philosophy, both ancient and modern, there is probably no one who has attained so eminent a position as Plato. What Homer was to Epic poetry, what Cicero and Demosthenes were to oratory, and what Shakespeare was to the drama of England, Plato was to ancient philosophy, not unapproachable nor unapproached, but possessing an inexplicable but unquestioned supremacy. The authentic records of his life are meagre, and much that has been written concerning him is of a speculative nature. He was born at Athens in the year 427 B.C. His father's name was Ariston, and his mother's family, which claimed its descent from Solon, included among its members many Athenian notables, among whom was Oritias, one of the thirty tyrants. In his early youth Plato applied himself to poetry and painting, both of which pursuits he relinquished to become the disciple and follower of Socrates. It is said that his name was originally Aristocles, but that it was changed to Plato on account of the breadth of his shoulders and forehead. He is also said to have been an expert wrestler and to have taken part in several important battles. He was the devoted friend and pupil of Socrates, and during the imprisonment of his master he attended him constantly, and committed to writing his last discourses on the immortality of the soul. After the death of Socrates it is supposed that Plato took refuge with Euclides in Megara, and subsequently extended his travels into Magna Graecia and Egypt. Upon his return to Athens he taught those who came to him for instruction in the grove named Academus, near the Cephisus, and thus founded the first great philosophical school, over which he continued to preside until the day of his death. Above the entrance to this grove was inscribed the legend: "Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here." Here he was attended by persons of every description, among the more illustrious of whom were Aristotle, Lycurgus, Demosthenes and Isocrates....
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Apology of Socrates - Project Gutenberg's Apology, Crito,...

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