PLS_301_Bureaucracies_Outline

PLS_301_Bureaucracies_Outline - PLS 301 State Politics...

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PLS 301 State Politics State Bureaucracy Outline State Bureaucracies I. Introduction - Looked in negative light II. History -Pendleton Act 1883, passed after Garfield's assassination A. Civil service/merit system 1. Prohibition against using party ID. - Can't be given a post because of party status 2. Use of competitive examinations. - Get job on basis of merit, passing civil service exam 3. Bipartisan independent commission - Watch dog to insure there is no patronage and the rules are followed 4. Critique of merit system. - In beginning, test of whether or not an individual knew english (literacy test) - Process of hiring takes a long time - Pay increases based on merit discourages individuals working in teams (poor effect on policy) B. States slow in embracing merit system. - 1930s/40s -- based on patronage III. Public Employees A. Attitudes toward public employees - Negative image - Face to face interaction with the public - Surveys found that generally, individuals have a low regard for bureaucrats as a whole - State and local govts employ roughly 15.6 million people - Federal govts employ 2.5 million people - Local level: elementary schools , hospitals, highways, firefighters etc B. Gender differentiation - Majority bureaucrats: white male, higher education IV. Personnel Management A. Civil service commissions B. Unionization - Teachers are most unionized government employees - Generally have more restrictions on what they can do than private sector unions (ex.
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