Vierra_ResearchEssay.pdf - Cody Vierra The Trades of Coffee A customer walks into their local coffee shop and orders a cup of coffee They drink the

Vierra_ResearchEssay.pdf - Cody Vierra The Trades of Coffee...

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Cody Vierra The Trades of Coffee A customer walks into their local coffee shop and orders a cup of coffee. They drink the coffee and becomes enthralled by what’s in their cup, so, they ask the barista about it. “What is this?”, asks the customer. The barista replies, “...black coffee.” “Yeah but where from?!”, they quickly respond. The barista, taken back by the customers interest, tells the person it’s from a fair trade farm in Guatemala. Why should this matter? Or better yet, who cares? Coffee is coffee and we drink it everyday. But, that is exactly why it matters. Coffee is consumed more today than it has ever been throughout history (Coffee consumption reaches, 2019). And how much do we really know about it and where it comes from? There are so many aspects that go into a cup of coffee. Origin and region, washed or natural, light and dark roast, organic certified or not, fair trade and direct trade, these are just a few of those aspects. For this paper I would like to focus on the last two. Fair trade coffee and direct trade coffee are terms that many people might not know about when they purchase that cup of coffee in the morning. However, they are very important aspects to the coffee and its origin. Coffee has a long history spanning all the way back to the 9th century. The legend of how coffee started began with a goat herder in Ethiopia. (National Coffee Association) Goat herder Kaldi noticed that after his goats ate the berries from a certain tree they would become energetic and unable to sleep at night. He reported his finding to his monastery and they made a drink from the berries. After drinking, they found that it kept them awake and alert through their prayer
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sessions. They shared their discovery with others and this is how coffee came to be. By the 15th century, trade and coffee cultivation began.
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  • Summer '19
  • Mary Broding
  • Coffee, Trades, Research Paper, Trades of Coffee

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