Experiment 16 Electric Field and Electric Potential.docx - Report for Experiment#16 Electric Field and Electric Potential Madeline Gershman Lab Partners

Experiment 16 Electric Field and Electric Potential.docx -...

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Report for Experiment #16 Electric Field and Electric Potential Madeline Gershman Lab Partners: Daniel Potapov TA: Rebecca Harman January 22 nd , 2019 Abstract This experiment examined the relationship between an electric field and electric potential difference through the analysis of electrodes on conducting paper. The first investigation consisted of parallel electrodes, and the value of the electric field found from the experiment was 89.664 ± 0.443738 V/m ; this value does not agree the theoretical value of 100 V/m. The second investigation consisted of circular electrodes, and the value of the electric field varied amongst the different radii; it did not agree with the theoretical values.
Introduction In this experiment, the relationship between electric field and electric potential was investigated using systems of electrodes. Two charged objects, in this case a pair of electrodes, interact through their electric fields; each charged object creates a field that either attracts or repels other charged objects. These fields can only be realized when there exists another charged object to interact with it. The magnitude of the force can be found with the equation F = qE where q represents the magnitude of charge of the object interacting with the field. Electric fields are vector fields, meaning each point on the field has a magnitude and direction that varies depending on the position relative to that of the charge. Given the two electrodes, each being charged with different potentials, and situated at a given distance between them, the magnitude of the field at a given point can be found using the equation E = −( V b V a ) ( x b x a ) = ∆V ∆ x Potential fields occur where electric fields exist; the potential at a specific position can be measured relative to the ground. Lines of a potential field can be mapped out by marking the potentials at different positions on an electric field and tracing equipotential lines. Potential fields, unlike electric fields, are scalar, meaning they do not contain a direction, only a magnitude at varying positions. Electric field lines
and their complimentary equipotential lines are perpendicular to each other; their relationship can be modeled by V b V a =− E∙dr In investigation 1, two parallel electrodes are placed on a sheet of conducting paper and attached to a power source, with a positive terminal placed on one and negative terminal placed on the other, creating an electric field. Using a probe, the potential was measured, and the locations of each potential was marked, so the electric field lines could be drawn and visualized. Following this, equipotential lines were drawn to reveal the size and scope of the potential field could be seen. With the potentials and positions recorded, the electric field magnitude could be found and analyzed.

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