4 - Organizational Systems - Task 3 Paper - Healthcare Comparison to Switzerland.docx - Running head TASK THREE 1 Task Three Western Governors

4 - Organizational Systems - Task 3 Paper - Healthcare Comparison to Switzerland.docx

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Running head: TASK THREE 1 Task Three Western Governors University
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TASK THREE 2 Task Three Country to Compare In order to understand the complexities of health care in different parts of the world the healthcare systems of the United States (U.S.) and Switzerland will be compared in terms of access for children, the unemployed, and retirees, medication coverage, requirements for seeing a specialist, and coverage for pre-existing conditions. Access Access to health care in both Switzerland and the U.S. is regulated by the government at the federal and state levels. Both countries finance health care coverage partly through tax revenues and allow each Swiss canton or U.S. state to regulate premiums and subsidies based on income and other pertinent factors (Mossialos et al., 2016). While both countries utilize private health insurance companies to provide coverage to residents, all Swiss residents are legally obligated to purchase universal health coverage through those private companies while U.S. residents can purchase private health insurance, share the cost of health insurance benefits with their employers, or opt out and pay a tax penalty for being uninsured (Mossialos, Djordjevic, Osborn, & Sarnak, 2016). Children Mandatory health insurance (MHI) in Switzerland is not provided through a person’s employer and has to be purchased separately for each resident, even if they are a dependent (Mossialos et al., 2016). Because MHI is universal, all insured individuals pay 10% coinsurance after a minimum deductible is met until a cost-sharing cap is reached (Mossialos et al., 2016). For Swiss children up to age 18, both the minimum deductible and the coinsurance cap are lower than those for adults and there is no coinsurance payment required for inpatient hospital care up
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TASK THREE 3 to age 25 (Mossialos et al., 2016). Children up to age 18 receive dental and vision coverage through MHI while individuals over the age of 18 only receive dental or vision coverage if it is deemed medically necessary (Mossialos et al., 2016). Children in the U.S. can get access to healthcare in several different ways. U.S. health insurance, unlike those in Switzerland, can either be purchased by an individual or provided through an employer and covers dependents (Mossialos et al., 2016). As part of the Affordable Care Act, children can stay on a parent’s insurance plan until they are 26 years old (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS], n.d.). Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are state regulated programs that provide subsidies for children in low-income families based on factors relevant to each state (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS], n.d.). Finally, if a child’s family cannot get coverage through a private insurance plan and does not qualify for Medicaid or CHIP, they can still get access to healthcare for their child through a community health center (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS], n.d.).
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  • Fall '17
  • Task 3, C489, Swiss Vs. US Health System, Health System Comparison

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