2 - EBP Task 2 - Paper.docx - Running head TASK TWO 1 Task Two Evidence Based Practice and Applied Nursing Research Western Governors University TASK

2 - EBP Task 2 - Paper.docx - Running head TASK TWO 1 Task...

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Running head: TASK TWO 1 Task Two Evidence Based Practice and Applied Nursing Research Western Governors University
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TASK TWO 2 Task Two A1. Health Care Problem Prior to undergoing any surgical procedure, patients are informed of the possible risks and complications involved. One preventable complication that can lead to other complications for surgical patients is unintended intraoperative hypothermia. Any body temperature lower than 36 is considered hypothermic (Adriani & Moriber, 2013, p. 446). According to research, the anesthetic methods and agents used during surgery prevent the body’s ability to regulate its temperature through normal mechanisms which can result in hypothermic body temperatures during and after surgery (Rosenkilde, Vamosi, Lauridsen, & Hasfeldt, 2017, p. 420). Patients are arriving to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) after surgery with body temperatures in a hypothermic state. A2. Significance of Problem Surgical patients under anesthesia are not able to self-regulate their body temperature and are at high risk for developing hypothermia unless preventative measures are taken. According to Torossian et al. (2015), patients whose temperatures reach a hypothermic state during surgery are at high risk for complications including surgical site infections due to decreases in blood flow to the operative wound, cardiac problems potentially caused by decreased blood potassium levels, coagulation issues, and prolonged anesthetic effects that can lead to prolonged stays in the PACU. Patient discomfort and shivering is also a notable factor when their temperature is below normal limits when waking from anesthesia.
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TASK TWO 3 A3. Current Practices Our current practice to prevent the complication of inadvertent intraoperative hypothermia during surgical procedures is the use of forced-air warming blankets once the patient is under anesthesia and draped for surgery. Patients are sometimes given warmed blankets preoperatively, however, this is inconsistent from patient to patient depending on the staff members, and no active prewarming is done prior to surgery. Transport from the preoperative are to the colder temperatures in the operating room without prewarming can contribute to an initial decrease in a patient’s body temperature. This has the potential to enhance the hypothermic effect on the patient after induction of anesthesia which increases the chance of hypothermic body temperatures postoperatively (Shin et al., 2015, p. 5). A4. Impact on Background Postoperative patients who arrive to the PACU with hypothermic body temperatures do not metabolize the anesthetic medications as quickly as patients in a normothermic state after a surgical procedure (Steelman, Schaapveld, Perkhounkova, Reeve, & Herring, 2017, p. 461).
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  • Research, TASK 2, Evidence Based Practice, Randomized controlled trial, Evidence-based medicine, PICO, EBP, Post Anesthesia Care Unit, nursing problem, hypothermia., C361

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