20190926_040837945.pdf - This study provides some interesting descriptive data regarding the marital satisfaction of doctoral students Some limitations

20190926_040837945.pdf - This study provides some...

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This study provides some interesting descriptive data regarding the marital satisfaction of doctoral students. Some limitations, however, impact the validity and reliability of the results. The low response rate poses external validity threats, and the small sample size may have precluded significant results. In addition, the researchers 30 provided very little information about the sampling frame, such as the type of graduate programs, geographic locations, or any demographic information (Brannock et al., 2000). Katz et al. (2000) conducted a study to examine the effects of stress on medical student marriages. Their sample included sixty students and spouses (30 couples) from a large southeastern medical school. The survey packet included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck et al., 1961) to measure depression, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS; Spanier, 1976) to measure marital satisfaction, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) to measure experienced stress, and the Spouse Specific Support Scale (SSSS; Cohen, Mermelstein, Kamarck, & Hoberman, 1985) to measure spousal support in the form of cohesion and intimacy. No significant differences were found between students and spouses or between males and females on the four main study variables (stress, marital support, marital satisfaction, and depressive symptoms). For medical students, higher levels of stress were associated significantly with higher levels of depression (r = .54, p < .01) and lower levels of marital satisfaction (r = -.45, p < .01). In addition, spousal support had a significant main effect on marital satisfaction (β = .70, p < .01). Similar zero-order correlations were found for spouses, such that higher levels of stress were associated significantly with higher levels of depression (r = .42, p < .05) and lower levels of marital satisfaction (r = -.41, p < .01). In addition, spousal support and stress had an interaction effect on spouses’ marital satisfaction (β = -.56, p < .01), such that spousal support buffered the effects of stress on marital satisfaction. In addition to these
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  • Fall '12
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  • Qualitative Research, Sori

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