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Mackey 1 Hailey Mackey Professor Dolive FMS 120.02 9 October 2017 Lord Byron: Manfred Throughout Lord Byron’s Manfred , the themes of guilt and forbidden love is explicitly noticeable. This alludes to the broken connection between Manfred as a character and his absence of human contact. Manfred perfectly embodies Byron’s vision of a Byronic hero. A Byronic hero is an isolated, arrogant, passionate, powerful, knowledgeable, and haunted being. All of these characteristics can be used to describe Manfred’s character. Manfred submits to no spiritual authority or person, he answers only to himself. He clearly knows he is powerful and is capable of manipulating spirits, this control feeds into his ego. In Act Two Scene Two, he summons the Witch of the Alps and asks for her help, when she offers it he refuses. All she asked in return was that he serves her. His refusal shows his arrogance and narcissistic ways. He knows he is capable of summoning spirits when he pleases, this feeds his arrogance. In Act three, the Abbot of St. Maurice visits Manfred in the hall of his castle. He knows that Manfred has been playing around with spirits. He offers to save Manfred's soul if he repents, of course Manfred declines. He is beyond stuck in his Byronic hero characteristics that he refuses to save his own soul. One can argue that he is refusing help because he wants to die, or maybe he is just stubborn. Manfred declines help because he wants to

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