Bio Chapter 1 Clean Study Guide - Chapter 1 Section 1 What...

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Chapter 1 Section 1: What is Science?Where did plants and animals come from? How did I come to be?Humans have tried to answer these questions in different ways. Some ways of explaining the world have stayed the same over time. Science, however, is always changing.What are the goals of science?One goal of science is to provide natural explanations for events in the natural world. Science also aims to use those explanations to understand patterns in nature and to make useful predictions about natural events.Biology is not just a collection of never-changing facts or unchanging beliefs about the world.Some scientific “facts” will change soon—if they haven’t changed already – and scientific ideas are open to testing, discussion, and revision. Science is an organized way of gathering and analyzing evidence about the natural world.For example, researchers can use science to answer questions about how whales communicate, how far they travel, and how they are affected by environmental changes.Science deals only with the natural world.Scientists collect and organize information in an orderly way, looking for patterns andconnections among events.Scientists propose explanations that are based on evidence, not belief. Then they testthose explanations with more evidence.The physical universe is a system composed of parts and processes that interact. All objects in the universe, and all interactions among those objects, are governed by universal natural laws.One goal of science is to provide natural explanations for events in the natural world.Science also aims to use those explanations to understand patterns in nature and to make useful predictions about natural events.Despite all of our scientific knowledge, much of nature remains a mystery. Almost every major scientific discovery raises more questions than it answers. This constant changeshows that science continues to advance.Learning about science means understanding what we know and what we don’t know.Science rarely “proves” anything in absolute terms. Scientists aim for the best understanding of the natural world that current methods can reveal.Science has allowed us to build enough understanding to make useful predictions about the natural world.What procedures are at the core of scientific methodology?Scientific methodology involves observing and asking questions, making inferences and forming hypotheses, conducting controlled experiments, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions.Scientific investigations begin with observation, the act of noticing and describing events or processes in a careful, orderly way.For example, researchers observed that marsh grass grows taller in some places thanothers. This observation led to a question: Why do marsh grasses grow to different heights in different places?
After posing questions, scientists use further observations to make inferences, or logical interpretations based on what is already known.

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