7-3 FINAL PROJECT- MILESTONE TWO- A doorway into violence and crime.docx

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7-3 FINAL PROJECT: MILESTONE TWO1A Doorway into Understanding Violence and CrimeTeasha BanksProfessor: Dr. Tonya InmanSouthern New Hampshire University
7-3 FINAL PROJECT: MILESTONE TWO 2Teasha BanksPSY-205-T6014 Forensic Psychology 19EW619 July 2019 FridayA Doorway into Understanding Violence and CrimeFear and suspicion of the mentally ill by the general populace have historically complicated both the identification and treatment of individuals suffering from psychiatric disorders. Individuals suffering from mental disorders, particularly those that include psychotic symptoms such as schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorders, have been characterized as being prone to unpredictable and violent behavior by the media and depictions in literature and films. The tragic phenomenon of mass shootings that have plagued the United States for decades provides a prime example of the haste with which politicians and commentators attribute such events to mental illness. Before information about the motivation of a perpetrator is available, some individuals are calling for increased mental health screenings. While this may have a positive effect on public safety, it does reinforce the negative image of individuals with psychoticdisorders. A detailed analysis of recent scientific studies on the relationship between psychotic disorders and variances in violent behavior provides a reasonable basis for investigating the existence and nature of any correlation between the two. Matthias Angermeyer (2000) conducteda systematic review of every epidemiological study on the relationship between schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders and violent behavior published over the prior decade.Angermeyer reviewed a total of nine studies in his analysis, all of which were conducted in countries with predominantly western cultures. Study locations included the United States,
7-3 FINAL PROJECT: MILESTONE TWO 3Switzerland, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Israel. Investigators used a variety of methodologies, including birth cohort study; community-based study; records review (hospital admissions); case linkage study; and targeted demographic (homicide offenders) (Angermeyer, 2000, p. 65). The author approached his review of these studies from two perspectives: relative risk (odds ratio) and population-attributable risk (Angermeyer, 2000, p. 63). Relative risk assesses the association between psychotic disorders and the risk of violence by comparing the risk of violent behavior among individuals with a disorder with the risk among individuals who do not have a disorder. This ‘risk ratio’ provides direct support for a causal relationship between psychiatric disorders and violent behavior. Most of the studies under consideration in the review

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